The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 2)

“Death of Pte. Alex. Conley. Mrs. Hiram Ibey received a sad message this week that her brother, Pte. Alex. Conley had died of wounds at No. 7 Casualty Clearing Station, France, September 2nd, gun shot wound, right leg fractured. Pte. Conley went overseas from Belleville with the 80th Battalion, then transferred to 50th Battalion, and now numbered with the gallant soldiers who gave their lives for liberty and freedom. This is the fourth time he had been wounded. Another brother gave his life about six months ago. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved ones.”

[Note: Private Alex Conley died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 387 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 2)

“Card of Thanks. The officers and members of St. Julien Chapter, I.O.D.E. wish to thank all those who so kindly assisted and made the Tag Day on Sept. 14 so successful. The sum of $561 was realized and will be devoted to the Christmas parcels for our boys overseas.”

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 2)

“Red Cross Care Of Wounded Soldiers. Mrs. Richard Stapley of this city, is in receipt of the following letter referring to her son, Pte. Ted Stapley, who was recently wounded: Information Bureau, Canadian Red Cross Society, 12 Berners Street, London, W.I., August 28th, 1918.

Dear Madam:—I beg to inform you that Pte. E. G. Stapley 2584305, 38th Canadians, is in the Chester Military Hospital, Chester, England. He is suffering from a gun shot wound in the abdomen, and only arrived from France on the 25th. Our Red Cross visitor has called and seen him, but was not able to find out much as he had only just arrived. He will be visited regularly, and should he be in need of any comforts other than those supplied by the hospital, we will gladly send them to him from our parcel office. We shall be able to give you more details next week. Yours truly, D. Forester.”

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Coal Situation. Yesterday afternoon a meeting of the Fuel Committee in connection with the City Council was held at which Mr. T. F. Wills, Fuel Controller, was present, after a trip to New York and Boston. It was decided to procure on behalf of the city a quantity of coal for delivery in the near future. Mr. Wills informed a representative of The Intelligencer that he is in a position to secure a considerable quantity of coal for delivery in the city within a reasonable time. This may be taken advantage of by the City Council.”

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 7)

“K. of C. Hut Fund Half Subscribed. One of the most noticeable features of the present Campaign for the K. of C. Army Hut Fund is the number of voluntary subscribers, who have walked into the Campaign Headquarters, corner of Bridge and Front Streets, with generous donations for this most worthy cause. …

The canvassers, are making every endeavor to call at every house in Belleville, but it is not always possible to find the householder at home, or it may not be convenient for them at the time to meet the canvassers. For this reason the committee is making a great sacrifice to keep the headquarters open all the time. …  It is not believed that any person in Belleville would deliberately avoid giving, which is an absolute duty, to this fund. …

Up until noon today the returns from Belleville District show very nearly half of the objective has been reached. The subscriptions heard from amount in the neighborhood of $2,250. …  In Belleville every class of citizen has been represented in the general subscriptions, that have been recorded.”