The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 2)

“Boys for the Farms. With the closing of the schools on account of the influenza epidemic many of the boys engaged during the summer on farms as Soldiers of the Soil will return to farm labor. Mr. Brockel, Secretary of Belleville Y. M. C. A. will be glad to put farmers in touch with boys willing to resume farm work.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 2)

“Invalided Home. Lance-Corporal Loadsman, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Loadsman of Herkimer Ave., Belleville, arrived here on the 10th of October, being invalided home. On Saturday he entertained a number of friends and had a most enjoyable evening. Their oldest son George Loadsman, is still serving in France.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 2)

“Three Soldiers Pass Away. Within the past 48 hours three members of the Depot Battalion stationed in Belleville have answered the final roll call. Yesterday Pte. W. J. Griffin passed away and this morning Ptes. Cyril Henry Cox and George Edwin Dillow died. The latter two are cousins and they came from McKee’s Port, Pennsylvania. In both cases the mothers of the boys were here when the end came. Pneumonia was the cause of death in all cases.”

[Note: Private William John Griffin died on October 15, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 420 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private Cyril Henry Edward Cox died on October 15, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 390 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private George Edward Dillow died on October 14, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 398 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 5)

“What last year’s Victory Loan achieved. Last year the people of Canada lent the nation $425,000,000 by buying Victory Bonds. And because Canada now needs more money and will presently ask the people to lend it, the people have a right to know what was accomplished by last year’s loan.

Every dollar of it was spent in Canada. Not only was it spent in Canada—it was circulated—it became the working capital of the nation.

Be ready when the call comes to lend your money.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 6)

“Christmas Puddings Will Be Raisinless. Overseas Christmas stockings will be minus something good to eat this year, says a Toronto despatch. So will Christmas plum puddings and mince pies, not to mention numerous other good things. It’s not nuts or dates—not figs or sugar—not currants or butter, but good, old-fashioned raisins.

For at present raisins are scarcely to be had in Toronto and there doesn’t seem to be much chance of a brighter outlook. The fact that many Christmas stockings will have to go overseas without raisins is a great blow to the women filling them for weeks past.

The Canada Food Board has notified importers in Toronto that raisins will not be allowed to come into Canada this year from Spain, from where the Malaga raisins for table use are shipped. …  The other source of supply for raisins is California, and though the Food Board has not forbidden their admittance into this country, the United States Government has. …  The reason given is that the Government needs all the raisins California can produce in its own country for its own troops. The raisins are being used in a number of cases in place of sugar, as they contain a large percentage of sugar.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 7)

“Spitting Rule Should Be Enforced. Police Magistrate Farrell of Kingston, announced in court that the regulation forbidding spitting on the street or in public places, would be rigidly enforced for the duration of the present epidemic, at least. This regulation is law in Belleville and should be strictly enforced.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 7)

“Sapper Leavitt Killed. Word has been received in the city conveying the sad message that Ralph Leavitt, No. 500703, had been killed in action on September 27th. He enlisted in 1915 and went overseas early in the spring of 1916, and was recently awarded the military medal at the battle of the Somme. Ralph was well known in Belleville. He was a son of Mr. Leavitt who for a number of years was the proprietor of the Massassaga Park Hotel. Two brothers are also in the service, Ray, who is with the Motor Air Line Signal Corps in France and Roscoe with the Canadian Engineers at St. Johns, Quebec.”

[Note: Lance Corporal Ralph Leavitt died on September 27, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 447 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 7)

“Second Time Wounded. Mr. Walter Wheeler, residing at 37 Ridley Street, city, was yesterday in receipt of the following telegram from Ottawa which refers to his son: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that 1027455 Lance Corporal Harvey Wheeler, admitted to Beaufort War Hospital, Bristol, on Oct. 4th. Gunshot wounds in right shoulder and neck.’

Lance Corp. Wheeler enlisted and went overseas with the 235th Battalion from this city. Previous to enlistment he was employed at the Ontario Office in this city. This is the second time he has been wounded.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Lucas Gassed. Mrs. Elenor Lucas, residing in this city, received the following telegram from the Director of Records. ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that 1027631 Pte. Wm. Henry Lucas, infantry, officially reported admitted to No. 58 General Hospital Etaples Oct. 2 shell gas.’ Pte. Lucas enlisted with the 235th Battalion and went overseas from this city.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Murray Wounded. Mrs. A. Murray residing at 90½ Canifton Road, city, is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 636621 Pte. Francis Leo Murray, infantry, officially reported admitted to 32 Canadian Clearing Station, Sept. 30th gunshot wound in knee.’

Pte. Murray enlisted and went overseas with the 155th Battalion from this city. Previous to enlistment he was a G.T.R. employee and was only 19 years of age. His many friends in this city will hope for a speedy recovery.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Collyer Wounded. Mr. W. R. Collyer, residing on Herchimer Avenue, city, to-day received the following message from the Director of Records: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 192194 Herbert John Oscar Collyer, infantry, reported officially admitted to 7th Convalescent Depot, Boulogne, Oct. 3rd, gunshot wound in right hand.’

Pte. Collyer, who was formerly a G. T. R. fireman, enlisted with the 92nd Highlanders, but is now with the 42nd Highlanders. This is the second time he has been wounded. He has been overseas two and a half years. It is sincerely hoped that the wound will prove to be only slight.”

The Intelligencer October 15, 1918 (page 8)

“Board of Health Public Notice. Owing to the prevailing epidemic of Influenza, it has been decided that in the interest of the Public Health, that all precaution should be taken to prevent the spread of the epidemic.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all Schools, Churches, Theatres, Lodges, and other places of Public gatherings shall close from this date October 15th, 1918, and shall remain closed until further notice. A. McGie, chairman, Board of Health. H. A. Yeomans, Medical Officer of Health.”