The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 1)

“Capt. Cousins Dead From Influenza. Capt. Arthur G. Cousins of the schooner Newlands and whose home is in this city, died at an early hour this morning in the General Hospital at Oswego, N.Y. He was taken ill a few days ago while in Oswego harbor with his vessel and despite every attention passed away, a victim of the prevailing influenza epidemic.

Capt. Cousins was the youngest captain between Father Point and Detroit, being but 34 years of age at death and was only 26 years old when he received his master’s papers. Previous to that he was employed at Point Ann. Mrs. Cousins accompanied him on the trip to Oswego, and was with him when the end came. He was a member of the I.O.F. Society. A family of five children, the youngest an infant, survives. The body will be brought here for interment.”

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 1)

“Industrial Evening Classes Formed. At the High School building last evening Night Classes were commenced under the supervision of Mr. P. C. McLaurin, Principal of the School. It was anticipated that a considerable number in the city would take advantage to thus improve their education, but the attendance was far in excess of anticipations. No less than 175 were present and among these were two who could neither read nor write.

The number desiring to take short hand and typewriting were such that three classes will be necessary. There was also a good class desirous of learning mechanical drawing. Many are desirous of taking French, and not a few made enquiries regarding being taught Spanish. A teacher is available in this city to teach this language. The chemistry, bookkeeping, dressmaking, English and higher mathematics were all well attended also the domestic science class. While a class in millinery was not formed, a number made applications to be taught how to trim head gear.

Ten teachers were last evening busily engaged and more teachers will have to be secured as it is deemed necessary not to have more than 12 or 15 pupils in any class, so that more individual attention can be given to the pupils.

Principal McLaurin is more than delighted at the prospects for a successful term, as it is apparent that there will be at least two hundred in attendance in the near future. Classes will be taught on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and possibly on other evenings.”

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 7)

“ ‘Flu’ Hits Business. Belleville business places are hard hit by the influenza epidemic and working staffs are very much depleted.”

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 7)

“V.A.D. Nurses Wanted. Renfrew is sorely stricken with the influenza epidemic but on account of the prevalence of so much illness in other centres is unable to secure a sufficient number of professional nurses to cope with the situation. A call has been sent out for V.A.D. nurses to go to Renfrew, and V.A.D.’s in this vicinity who are willing to go should telegraph at once to Dr. J. C. Mitchell, Eastern Hospital, Brockville.”

[Note: V.A.D. = Voluntary Aid Detachment.]

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 7)

“Gargle Drill. An interesting feature of daily routine at the local military headquarters is the ‘gargle drill,’ the soldiers being regularly lined up daily, each with a tin cup in hand containing antiseptic solution. When the word is given each soldier proceeds to gargle his throat and the ensuing noises are varied and weird, suggesting the last gasps of German kulture. This is just one of the precautions taken by the local military authorities to prevent an epidemic of influenza among the soldiers.”

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 7)

“Thrice Wounded. Sergt. James H. Turney, who went overseas with the 59th Battalion, and was wounded three times, has been invalided home, and yesterday his wife at 280 Coleman street, city, received a telegram from Quebec saying: ‘Arrived. Will be home soon.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 7)

“To Reduce Fire Losses. Throughout Ontario to-day was observed as the first Provincial ‘Fire Prevention Day,’ which was set aside for this purpose by proclamation issued by the Ontario Government. The idea has taken hold throughout the Province, and everywhere steps are being taken to minimize as much as possible the appalling fire loss which this country annually suffers. In the various schools in this city the proclamation of the Lieutenant Governor was read, which set forth the needs of children and others co-operating in a general cleaning up day and removing inflammable rubbish.”

The Intelligencer October 9, 1918 (page 8)

“Great Organization Rally Of Victory Loan Workers. The first shot in the 1918 Victory Loan campaign for the sale of one-half billion of Canada’s War Bonds was fired yesterday in Toronto, when the County Chairmen and Publicity Chairmen from all over the Province gathered together for the purpose of listening to inspiring addresses by Canada’s most representative financial business and professional men. …  If the loan were not a success all the magnificent work that has been done by our fighting men in the past four years would be in vain, as at the last moment Canada would have to slacken the efforts of her noble army because we at home had failed them. …

Mr. W. B. Deacon, Hastings County Chairman, and Mr. W. L. Doyle, Publicity Chairman for the County, were present representing Hastings County.”