The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 1)

“Captured German Guns From France Will Be Forwarded to Belleville. German guns captured by the 2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment, will in due time reach Belleville and become the property of the city as permanent mementoes of the prowess of Belleville officers and soldiers in the great war.

A representative collection of captured German guns has been assembled by Belleville officers at the front for shipment to this city and the trophies will no doubt be greatly appreciated by the citizens. In this connection ex-Mayor Ketcheson has received the following letter from Major R. Vanderwater:

In the Field, Oct. 10th, 1918. H.F. Ketcheson, Belleville, Ont., Canada. Dear Sir:—The following war trophies, captured by the 2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment, and presented to the Corporation of the City of Belleville by this Unit on behalf of Lieut. D. A. Cameron, M. C., Lieut. R. M. Porter, Lieut. R. B. Cooper, Sergt. W. C. Jack, M. M., and myself, are being despatched to you through the usual channels:—

One 10cm. Gun. No. 4984. Two 77m. Guns. Nos. 17253 and 11946. One heavy machine gun No. 40-443. One light machine gun No. 373. One heavy Trench Mortar No. 6446.

May I be advised please when these are received. Yours faithfully, (Sgd.) R. Vanderwater, Major O. C. 2nd Canadian Infantry Bat. Eastern Ont. Regiment.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 2)

“Called by Death: ‘Elmer J. MacDonald, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence MacDonald, Point Anne, died this morning from an attack of pneumonia.’

‘Mrs. Margaret Powers of this city died yesterday after a brief illness. Deceased was the wife of Mr. John Powers and was 42 years of age. Mrs. Powers was born in England, but had lived here some time. She was a member of St. Michael’s Church. In addition to the husband, her mother, Mrs. Mitchell, one brother John Lentz of Kingston and one sister Mrs. J. Hogan of this city survive.’

‘Ruby Iona Sine died at the Kingston General Hospital after three days illness from pneumonia. The deceased was fourteen years of age. Her father is W. T. Sine, of Stirling, where interment will take place.’

‘Mrs. Percy Alexander. Mrs. Myrtle E. Alexander, wife of Mr. Percy Alexander, passed away last night at her late home in this city, from an attack of pneumonia. Deceased was in her 26th year and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bowyer, of this city. She had lived here for the past twelve years. An infant son, husband, parents, two brothers and two sisters survive. The brothers are Sergt. Austin and Frank and the sisters are Mrs. David Lee and Miss Leah Bowyer of this city.’

‘Mrs. Nelson Shaw, who resided at Point Anne, died last night after an illness of short duration. Deceased was 33 years of age and was born in Quebec. For some years she had resided at Point Anne. Mrs. Shaw was a member of the Methodist Church. In addition to the husband three children survive.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 5)

Poster for Victory Bonds

“If this boy were your boy. If you had a boy in France to-day, you would make your purchase of Victory Bonds large enough to represent a real personal sacrifice.

You would buy all the Victory Bonds you could possibly find the money for—and you would find it by stinting yourself down to the barest necessities of life.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 6)

“Belleville’s Total Only $36,250. On the third day of the campaign Belleville’s contribution towards the success of Canada’s Victory Loan is only $9,200. This showing is very poor by comparison with other places. …  The big people haven’t started buying as yet. The returns from the manufacturers who have been working on munitions of war contracts have not started coming in as yet. It is hoped that when these do start coming the total will be quickly swelled.

The Grand Trunk Railway is well organized and a large return is expected from there, but as the company is financing the employees and taking the applications it will be some time before Belleville will receive credit for this. In the meantime it will be necessary for our local buyers of bonds to BUY NOW, and make Belleville’s showing look up. We want to fly that honor flag from the city hall before they are common all over the country. …

Great preparations are being made by the features committee to make the parade on Saturday morning a great success. The Depot Battalion headed by their bugle band, the XV Regimental band, the Great War Veterans, the Boy Scouts, decorated floats and automobiles will be in line. …

A suggestion has been made that the effigy of the ‘Bond Slacker’ will be hung on Front street on Saturday and burned on the market square at night. Look out for him—he is yellow!

At twelve o’clock noon on Saturday the Kaiser will be thrown from off the top of the city hall tower. To date no one has volunteered to play the part of the Kaiser, so a substitute will be made of straw.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Wounded and Missing. Mrs. Annie Green, residing at 47 Charlotte Street is in receipt of the following telegram: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that Pte. Alfred Woodrow Green, infantry officially reported wounded and missing Oct. 1st.’ Pte. Green enlisted and went overseas with the 39th Battalion from this city. He had previously been wounded and returned to the trenches.”

[Note: Private Alfred Woodrow Green died on October 1, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 419 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Lieut. Dan Cameron, M.C. The many friends of Lieut. Dan A. Cameron, of the Albert College staff, will be pleased to learn that he has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service in the war. Lt. Cameron’s modesty has prevented details of the award reaching his friends.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Remember the Sick. Young Canada is preparing to celebrate Halloween in the usual noisy fashion and many batteries of pea-shooters are prepared to go into action. While Halloween pranks are usually of a harmless nature and less destructive than in former years this year with so many people sick a curb should be placed on the exuberance of the young people and noise restrained as much as possible. Shooting peas against windows, ringing door bells, tick tacks, etc., can only annoy and may interfere with the recovery of sick people. Parents should remember this and keep the children off the streets tonight.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Awarded Military Medal. Private Bert Nunn, who was a student of Albert College previous to enlistment has been awarded the military medal for bravery upon the field of action.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Victory Loan Parade. The members of the Great War Veterans Association and all returned soldiers are requested to attend a parade for the Victory Loan at 10.30 Saturday morning at Victoria Park entrance. Permission has been granted to wear uniforms.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Epidemic Conditions. The local epidemic situation is about the same with a slight improvement in conditions if anything. The disease, however is taking a hold strongly in the rural districts where there is a dearth of medical and nursing facilities. Many are being inoculated with preventative serum. Local conditions do not seem favorable to any relaxation of precautions taken to prevent the spread of the disease.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Soldiers Cared For. While the Toronto Military District is occupying the centre of the stage respecting the lack of hospital facilities for the care of those suffering from the epidemic, it is interesting to know that in Military District No. 3 there is no cause for complaint. Hospital accommodation here is ample, and the mortality has been very low. The following figures speak for themselves: Total number in military hospitals under treatment for influenza on October 18, 642; deaths from influenza and pneumonia, 25. The number of cases has been reduced by 190 during the past ten days.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 7)

“Buried with Military Honors. With military honors the body of Private George E. Potter was yesterday afternoon consigned to the tomb at Belleville cemetery. Deceased was a member of the First Depot Battalion in this city and the members were paraded in full force under the command of Major Gifford.

At the Belleville Burial Company’s undertaking rooms on Campbell street Rev. S. C. Moore of the Tabernacle Church conducted a service and officiated at the interment. A firing party with reversed arms led the cortege followed by the bugle band of the battalion. Behind the hearse the members of the battalion marched. At the grave after the committal services a volley was fired and the last post sounded. The bearers were Private W. Bower, S. Walsh, R. Marsh, E. Drouin, S. Dumoulin and M. Marden.”

[Note: Private George Ralph Potter died on October 29, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 487 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 8)Delaney Furrier ad for Victory Bonds

“Let Us Show Our Thankfulness. The Canadian who takes the trouble to think will buy Victory Bonds, which furnish the sinews of war, if only out of sheer thankfulness that his lot was not cast in Belgium or Northern France.

Buy Victory Bonds. Joseph T. Delaney Furrier. 17 Campbell St. Phone 797. Opp. Y.M.C.A.”

The Intelligencer October 31, 1918 (page 8)

“Greene’s Special War Time Grafonola Outfits. These Columbia Grafonolas are small and portable and give excellent tone volume and tone quality.

They are particularly economical as well as cheery for war time use either at home or camp. J. M. Greene, Music Co. 316 Front St., Belleville, Ont.”