The Intelligencer January 2, 1918 (page 1)

“Canada, which since the war commenced has curtailed few of its pleasures and enjoyments is to feel the heavy hand of war in the near future if regulations now under consideration by the Government are carried out. …  in future money must be conserved for the war funds of the Dominion, which, though but recently replenished by the Victory Loan, will have to be further replenished before the New Year is many months old. …

A curtailment of individual consumption of tea, coffee, sugar and other essential commodities is also anticipated in the near future as a complement to the regulation at present under consideration in the United States. …

Probably one of the most serious problems which the Government now has to face is that of coal supply. Despite the fact that Canada imported more coal this year than last there is a real and alarming shortage even at this early period of a hard winter due primarily to hoarding on the part of individuals during the summer.

Householders should not be surprised if before long they find their bins inspected to discover whether they have accumulated more than their just share. If they have they may be gently requested to distribute their bounty at a price to their more needy but less provident neighbors.

A further restriction is expected in the use of gasoline for pleasure purposes. Luxuries are to be discouraged. The production and conservation of essentials are to be encouraged.”

The Intelligencer January 2, 1918 (page 1)

“Belleville Will Be Mobilization Centre. An unannounced number of men, physically fit and between the age of twenty and thirty-four will report for military service on Thursday. They have been given transportation which will bring them to Kingston. …

They will be examined by doctors, equipped with uniform and supplies and signed up as recruits in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Selections will be made of these men to all vacancies in the artillery, army medical corps, army service corps, etc. …  At the conclusion of this distribution 800 will be selected. Half of this number will go to Brockville, the remainder to Belleville. …  the officers who will have the administration of this new army know the conditions that have brought about the enlistment of these men.

There is no such word as coward known to the language of Canadians. It is rather only a frame of mind. The public have decided that these men should make the sacrifice and deeming the public right the majority wins. …

The message that is sent to all the men affected by the Military Service Act seems to be best quoted in the language of one headquarters staff officer who said, ‘Tell the boys that we will use them right and consider them as potential soldiers who are coming in to keep up the work that the first contingent started.’ “