The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Bellow Wounded. Miss Edith Asselstine, 78 Mill street, has received the following telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that Pte. Edward Bellow, infantry, is officially reported admitted to 12 General Hospital, Rouen on August 12th, gunshot wound in finger.’ This is the second time Pte. Bellow has been wounded.”

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Sergt. White Killed. Mrs. Ellen White, 78 Gordon street, has received a telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa, conveying the sad intelligence that Sergt. Chas. White, infantry, was killed in action, August 8. Sergt. White had recently been awarded the Military Medal for acts of gallantry and devotion to duty.

He served two years in France before making the supreme sacrifice and was a patriot and a hero in every sense of the word. Previous to enlistment he was engaged at the Anglo-American Hotel here as chef. He was 29 years of age, born in England, and leaves a wife and child who reside at 78 Gordon street.

A sister, Miss White, of Toronto, is with the bereaved family just now. A memorial service will be held for Sergt. Charles Lewis White, M. M., Sunday evening at St. Thomas Church.”

[Note: Sergeant Charles Lewis White died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 521 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Father and Son Fell Fighting For King, Canada and Freedom. Miss Florence Belton, 219 Front street, received a telegram from the Director of Records, Ottawa, apprising her that Corporal Frederick Belton was admitted to the First Birmingham War Hospital at Birmingham, England, on August 11, suffering with a gunshot wound in his arm.

Corporal Fred Belton, went overseas with the 39th Battalion, in 1915. He was twice wounded at the Battle of the Somme, Sept. 20th, 1916. He returned to the front in February, 1917. Was at Vimy Ridge, wounded again on the Somme, gunshot in the arm, 9th of August, 1918.

He is a son of Sergt. Alfred Belton, one of the ‘Originals’, who was Provost-Sergt. of Belleville in the 34th Battery, and went overseas with the First Contingent, going to France February 7th, 1915. He was in France two years, wounded at Fleur Baiux, but was able to remain with the guns. He went through the Battle of Langemarck, April 22, 1915; June, Festubert; July, Givincy; Aug. La Bassee and Armentieres; again going into action at Ploegstreete; returned to Ypres salient, February 1917; Dickibush and Hill 60 till July 1917, and then went to the Battle of the Somme, where he met his son Fred, not knowing that he was in France.

A week after this meeting father and son were both wounded and on their way to Blighty. Sergt. Belton, the father, was invalided home after being ten months in the Hospital, November, 1917; discharged January 31, 1918.

A gallant father of a gallant son in Sergt. Alfred Belton, late 1st Battery, 1st Brigade, C. F. A., late of all the glorious battlefields of France where he ‘done his bit’ all the way, now residing at 145 Foster Avenue, Belleville.”

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Driver Palmer Wounded. Mrs. Frances Palmer, 25 ½ Campbell street, received the following telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that Driver Percy Grant Palmer, artillery, is officially reported admitted to No. 3 Australian Hospital, Abbeville, August 10th, with gunshot wounds in the side.’ ”