The Intelligencer October 10, 1916 (page 1)

“Farewell Gathering. A very enjoyable evening was spent at the home of Mr. S. N. Jones, Yeoman street, when a number of young people gathered to bid farewell to Signaller S. J. Jones of the 155th Battalion, before leaving for overseas. The evening was spent in games and music and was brought to a close by singing ‘For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow’ and ‘God Save the King.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 10, 1916 (page 1)

“Impressive Services at St. Andrews Church. At St. Andrews Presbyterian church on Sunday a memorial service was held in connection with the regular service. The memorial service was for Lieut. Eugene Hyman, Private Walter Craig, Privates George and Raymond Matthew, who have been killed in action. The two latter were sons of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Matthew of Calgary, who when living in Belleville, were members of St. Andrew’s church.

A large congregation was present at the impressive service. The pastor, Rev. A. S. Kerr, officiated. …  At the conclusion of the sermon an appropriate hymn was sung, after which Rev. Mr. Kerr referred to the departed heroes.

Lieut. Hyman, who enlisted for oversea service, was in his youth a Sunday School scholar of St. Andrews church. He went away from the city and enlisted out west. He was popular and deservedly so.

Walter Craig was well known in the city, and also among the congregation of St. Andrew’s church. He had always been identified with the church. He enlisted from here and was killed whilst he (the speaker) was away attending the General Assembly. He was a fine young man and possessed of sterling qualities. In June last he met his death.

Privates George and Raymond Matthews were the only sons of a family who were members of St. Andrew’s church, but now reside in the west. They were exceptionally good boys, and were in relationship with the church. They enlisted out west. George died of wounds and Raymond was killed.

We mourn the passing away of these four soldiers, and loved ones are called upon to bear a heavy burden. They were loyal and gave their best for King and country. While words of sympathy seem vain and empty we extend to the loved ones our deepest sympathy in the loss they have sustained.

At the conclusion of the remarks by the pastor a hymn was sung and the congregation remained standing while the organist, Miss Fenn, played the Dead March, which was most impressive. …  The singing of the National Anthem brought the services to a close.”

[Note: Lieutenant Eugene McMahon Hyman died on September 26, 1916. He is commemorated on Page 107 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private Walter Stephen Craig died on June 4, 1916. He is commemorated on Page 72 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private Raymond Matthews died on June 7, 1916. He is commemorated on Page 133 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private George Matthews died on September 15, 1916. He is commemorated on Page 133 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 10, 1916 (page 2)

“Another Bellevillian Killed. The report was circulated on Saturday that Gunner Harold Boyle of Belleville, had been killed in action, and proved to be true. He was killed on September 27th, and an official message from the Record Office, Ottawa, to his father, Mr. Charles Boyle, has been received.

Gunner Boyle joined the 34th Battery of Belleville and left Kingston on June 15th, 1916, for overseas. He was only 19 years of age, and a young man who had many friends in this city. To the bereaved parents will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of all citizens. A brother, Sergeant-Major Gordon Boyle, is upon active service.”

[Note: Private Harold Boyle died on September 26, 1916. He is commemorated on Page 57 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]