The Intelligencer November 25, 1918 (page 6)

“Twenty Thousand Women In Munition Plants To-day. Ottawa. It is feared that the women will be the first to feel the pinch of readjustment. There are thousands of women in munition works who will no longer be needed and will not be required in the old lines. Fortunately in the last year there has been a reduction in the number of women employed on munitions. The number at one time ran as high as forty thousand, but at present will probably not run more than twenty thousand.

Then there are many women in banks, offices, etc., who are taking positions of soldiers at the front. These places have been promised to the old employees, and the women will be dismissed. In Ottawa there are many girls in war work who have already been notified that their services can no longer be continued. The problem of the women is regarded as likely to be the most serious this winter. Committee of women interested will be formed to advise and assist the repatriation committee.”

The Intelligencer November 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Memorial Services. A memorial service was held yesterday morning at eleven o’clock for the late Ptes. McGlashon and Green, and Sergeant Clarke of Coe Hill, in Christ Church. The service was conducted by the Rev. Rural Dean Swayne, assisted by Rev. A. L. Geen. The officers and men of the Depot Battalion attended and when the service opened there were few vacant seats in the church. Special and appropriate music was rendered by the choir and a member of the Depot Battalion accompanied the hymns on a cornet. The Dead March in Saul was played by the organist, Mrs. Campbell and the Last Post sounded by one of the Depot men.”

The Intelligencer November 25, 1918 (page 7)

“At eleven o’clock yesterday morning a memorial service was held in Holloway St. Methodist Church for the late Ptes. Cecil Brown and John Canniff, killed in action. Rev. J. N. Clarry, B. A. conducted the service and the choir rendered beautiful and appropriate music. The church was filled and every one realized the high price paid for our victory in the lives of our soldier heroes.”

The Intelligencer November 25, 1918 (page 7)

“In St. Thomas’ Church last evening at 7 o’clock, a memorial service was held for the late Pte. John Hutchinson, who died of pneumonia in Scotland, on November 18th. The service was conducted by Ven. Archdeacon Beamish and special music was rendered by the choir. The spacious church was filled with sympathizing friends of the bereaved family.”

The Intelligencer November 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Inspiring Service. Special Thanksgiving services were held in the Tabernacle Methodist Church yesterday to commemorate victory and peace. Rev. S. C. Moore, pastor, was in charge. The pulpit, organ and chancel of the sacred edifice was appropriately draped with the flags of the allies and presented an inspiring and patriotic appearance. In the evening a large congregation was present and the discourse by the pastor was in keeping with the occasion. …  During the service appropriate hymns were sung and the choir rendered suitable selections.”