The Intelligencer December 14, 1916 (page 2)

“With full military and Masonic honors the remains of the late Lieut. William C. McGinnis were yesterday afternoon consigned to the tomb at Belleville cemetery. The cortege was one of the largest seen in this city for some time, and as it passed through Front street the walks were lined with people.

At the residence of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur McGinnis, 269 George street, the burial services of the Presbyterian Church were conducted by Rev. E. C. Currie, Pastor of the John Street Church. Rt. Wor. Bro. Col. S. S. Lazier, conducted the Masonic burial services at the house. The spacious residence was filled with sympathizing friends during the solemn service.

At the conclusion of the service, the cortege was formed and proceeded down George street to Victoria avenue to Front street, thence across the lower bridge to Commercial street and to the cemetery. It was headed by the fine band of the 254th Battalion playing a funeral march.

The order of the cortege was as follows: 254th Battalion band, Masons in regalia, 235th Battalion band, Lt. O’Neil and Firing Party of 235th members, Clergy, Bearers, Hon. Bearers, Carriages with Flowers, Funeral car draped with Union Jack, Mourners in carriage, Military officers, Citizens on foot, Citizens in vehicles. …

Officers of the 254th and 235th Battalions who are in the city attended in a body. Upon arrival at the cemetery, Rev. E. C. Currie conducted the committal service of the church, and Rt. Wor. Bro. Mayor Ketcheson, a similar service of the Masonic lodge. The firing party discharged a volley and the last post was sounded.

That deceased was deservedly popular was attested to by not only the numbers in attendance at the obsequies, but the numerous beautiful floral designs contributed.

Major Thompson and Lieut. Gerald Ponton, of the Royal Canadian Engineers, St. John, Quebec, came up to represent that Corps at the funeral of their late comrade.”

[Lieutenant William Clark McGinnis died on December 11, 1916. He is commemorated on Page 126 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer December 14, 1916 (page 7)

“At the Khaki Club. Miss Helen Ketcheson gave a very fine programme at the Khaki Club on Wednesday evening. She was assisted by Miss Bowden and Miss Freda Johnson, of Bleecker Ave., who charmed everyone with her playing.

Miss Ketcheson was most fortunate in having also the splendid assistance of the 15th Battalion orchestra, whose bright music was a great treat. This act of courtesy and good feeling towards the Battalion’s wintering here, was very much appreciated, both by the officials of the Khaki Club and the soldier boys.

The canteen was well-looked after by Miss Robina Templeton and Miss Helen McCuaig.”