The Intelligencer January 12, 1918 (page 2)

“From Leslie Yerex 33rd Battery. Folkestone, Dec. 13, 1917. Dear Mother,—I was going to wait until I got back to France before writing, but as I have a little time to spare, here goes. I have had a swell time for fourteen days, the first leave I have had in London since going to France seventeen months ago. …

Do you remember a young girl named Beatrice Lily? She attended St. Agnes’ School and sang in the Palace Theatre in the evening. Well, she is making a great hit over here in the Variety Theatre on The Strand. She sings several songs of Canada and the papers here call her ‘our Canadian favorite.’ I went to hear her sing—and she’s pretty good. …

London is some town; you could walk around for a month and not see a quarter of it. …  Well, mother, I don’t think I realized what a life we lead and how hard it is until now, after being in civilization for two weeks, it seems like going out of the world altogether to go back. You should see the difference in the ‘leave’ trains. Coming everybody is as happy as a kid with a new toy and singing and laughing. Today we got on the train at Victoria station and I don’t believe there was a word said all the way. …

Now we are in Folkestone, waiting to cross to Boulogne. …  I will write again when I get across. Good-bye for now. LES.”

The Intelligencer January 12, 1918 (page 6)

“The Canadian War Contingent Association have received the following acknowledgment of parcels of Christmas cheer sent overseas:

“16th Can. General Hospital, Orpington, Kent, Dec. 19. C. W. C. A., 62 West Bridge Street, Belleville, Ont. My Dear Friends,—Your boxes of Christmas cheer for the wounded boys in my ward have arrived, and I want to thank you for such generous gifts. I have taken a peep at them, and they are beautiful big Christmas stockings, and there will be fifty-four very happy boys.

Not only will they have lots of good things, but they will be able to get a pair of socks—a thing that has been almost impossible here for weeks. Will you believe when I say, we have had a sock famine here for two months? …  The ones we have I fancy were made of poor wool, for the first washing or two shrank them to infant’s size, so of course the poor men can’t get into them. …

We are having some very wintry weather at present, with the ground covered with snow. At present I am writing this letter, dressed as if for out of doors. Besides being swathed in wool I have on a warm sweater, a heavy coat and woollen gloves—so if you can’t read this scribble you will forgive me. …

Again let me thank you all for bringing so much pleasure into the Tommies’ Christmas and for giving me the pleasure of dispensing your generosity. Affectionately yours, Ethel Anderson.”

The Intelligencer January 12, 1918 (page 6)

“Grand Masquerade Carnival. Belleville Arena, under the auspices of the Women’s Red Cross and Patriotic Association, for wool and hospital supplies.

Monday, Jan. 21st, 1918. Tickets 25¢; Coffee and Sandwiches 10¢. Band in Attendance. Good Prizes.”