The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 2)

“Letters Concerning Death of Pte. Black. Mrs. R. D. Black, 24 Hillside street, city, has received the following letters in connection with the death from wounds of her soldier son overseas: France Sept. 1, 1918. Dear Mrs. Black:—I very much regret to tell you that Pte. Black, Can. Inf. Battalion, is wounded. His condition is very serious. A surgeon specialist has seen him and is doing every thing he can to save his life. He has every care and attention and the chaplain has seen him. If there is any improvement in his condition I will write and let you know. With my sympathy. Yours sincerely C. E. Crawford, Sister in Charge.

From Rev. F. E. Walker, C. F., No. 7, C.C.S., B. E. F., France. Dear Mrs. Black:—May I express my very sincere sympathy with you in the sad loss you have sustained by the death of your son, Pte. W. F. H. Black, of the Canadians. He died of wounds at No. 33 C. C. S. on Sept. 5th, and was buried by me at the British Cemetery at Ligny, St. Flockel.

He has given his life for his country in the cause of Freedom and Right and he has not lived in vain. He is one of that great company of gallant men who have made the supreme sacrifice and every one of us will forever hold these men in honor. They have served and loved in honor. Your loved one is now in God’s gracious keeping. May He comfort your heart in this time of your sorrow. With deepest sympathy. Yours very sincerely, F. E. Walker, Chaplain.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 3)

“Kindly Sympathy Of Army Chaplain. Mrs. McGlashon, wife of Sergt. McGlashon, caretaker of the Armories, is in receipt of the following sympathetic letter from the Chaplain of the Battalion in which their son, Pte. David James McGlashon, was a member when he fell in action on August 11th: France, Sept. 6, 1918. Dear Mrs. McGlashon:—I am writing to assure you of the sincere sympathy of our Battalion with you in the death of your son, who was killed in action on August 11th. I should have written to you sooner, but I, myself, was wounded a few days later and have only now rejoined the battalion.

He was with his machine gun section during the attack of a strong enemy post and was seen to fall by the platoon sergeant. This was near the village of Fouquescourt and I believe his body was subsequently buried there when the line of battle had advanced. Our men did splendid work in the fighting in front of Amiens and won back miles of France for the Allied cause, and in all the battle none fought better than the platoon to which your son belonged. …

May the knowledge of your son’s self-sacrifice be a source of comfort to you. In all sympathy, believe me dear Mrs. McGlashon, I am Very faithfully yours, A. H. Priest, Chaplain.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 3)

“Fearless and Faithful Was This Soldier. Mrs. F. A. Carter has received the following letter from Major R. Vanderwater, officer commanding the battalion to which her husband was attached. Pte. Carter went overseas with the 155th Battalion from Belleville and was killed in action August 30, 1918:

Field, Sept. 5th, 1918. Mrs. F. A. Carter, 5 Boswell Street, Belleville, Ont. Dear Madam:—It is with the deepest regret that I have to confirm the official notification of the death of your husband, No. 636069, Pte. H. E. Carter. During the period of his connection with the Battalion he has always willingly and fearlessly performed any duty for which he was selected, and had in any other respect an excellent record.

His sacrifice of his life for the great cause for which we fight was a matter of great sorrow among his many friends here who join with me in the expression of sincere sympathy for you in your bereavement. Yours in sympathy, R. Vanderwater, Major, O.C., Canadian Infantry Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Baker Wounded. Rev. Dr. Baker has received a telegram stating that his son, Pte. F. E. Baker, has been wounded. Pte. Baker is suffering from a gunshot wound in the leg and is now at a clearing station in France. He left last March with the Cobourg Heavy Battery.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Carpet Bowling. A very enthusiastic meeting was held last night at Mr. F. H. Naylor’s studio for the purpose of organizing a carpet bowling club. …  After a friendly discussion it was decided to adopt the title of Belleville Carpet Bowling Club, all members present, being very keen players, and good sportsmen. Some enjoyable and evenly contested games are anticipated during the long winter evenings. The following officers were unanimously elected: President, Mr. P. K. Fisher; Vice-Pres., Mr. Don G. Bleecker; Sec. Treas., Mr. H. A. Lennox.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Theatre Improvements. As a result of Mr. John Griffin’s visit to Belleville this week plans are being prepared for improvements to Griffin’s Opera House. Lavatories will be installed and the heating system remodelled. Attention will also be paid to the ventilating of the theatre with a modern fan system to ensure purity of atmosphere at all times. Mr. Griffin is the moving spirit of the Griffin Amusement Corporation, which controls a number of theatres.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 7)

“S.O.S. Buttons for Girls. Official buttons for the girls who have participated in the Soldiers of the Soil Movement by engaging in farm work this summer have been received by Mr. Brockel, officer commanding the Soldiers of the Soil in this district, and can be obtained at the Y. M. C. A. office.”

The Intelligencer September 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Sympathy from Premier. Mrs. G. Thibault, residing at 48 Murney street, is in receipt of the following: ‘The Prime Minister and members of the Government of Canada, send their deepest sympathy in the bereavement which you have sustained.’ This refers to her husband who was killed in action August 28th.”