The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 7)

“Made Supreme Sacrifice. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Moore of Bancroft, received the sad intelligence on Monday that their son, Lloyd, had been killed in action on August 28th. He went overseas with the 254th Battalion from Belleville, and had been in the trenches about a year. He was only twenty years of age.”

[Note: Private Lloyd Moore died on August 28, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 473 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Edward Yorke Wounded. Mr. K. W. Yorke residing at 249 William street, city, is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you Pte. George Edward Yorke, infantry, officially admitted to Fort Pitt Military Hospital, Chatham, September 4th, gunshot wound left arm.’

Pte. Yorke enlisted and went overseas with the 48th Highlanders of Toronto, where he was living when the war broke out. For some years he was a resident of Belleville, where he was well known. Of five sons of Mr. Yorke three have been wounded in active service overseas.”

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 7)

“Third Time Wounded. Mrs. A. J. Jordan, residing at 73 Moira Street East, city, is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records, which refers to her brother: Sincerely regret to inform you Corporal Stanley Harris, infantry, officially reported admitted to 18 General Hospital, Dannes, Camiers, Sept. 4th, gunshot wound in left shoulder.’

Corporal Harris enlisted and went overseas with the 155th Battalion from this city. This is the third time he has been wounded, having previously received wounds on the right hip and face. He was also laid up in France for three months with an attack of pneumonia. His many friends in Belleville will hope for his speedy recovery.”

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 9)

Poster for saving money

“To every home there comes a time when every thought, every hope, every prayer for the future centres on the recovery of one loved one. In that hour of anguish, every means to recovery is sought—the highest medical skill, trained nurses, costly treatment. Does the price matter?

It may mean doing without things they think they need. It may mean privations, sacrifices, hardships. They make unbelievable savings, they achieve the impossible, but they get the money to pay.

To-day in this critical period of our nationhood, there is imperative need for MONEY—vast sums of money. Only one way now remains to obtain it. The nation must save, every community, every family, every individual Canadian must save.

Start TO-DAY. Save your money so that you may be in a position to lend it to your country in its time of need.

Published under the Authority of The Minister of Finance of Canada.”

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 11)

Ad for O'Keefe beer

“Changed in Strength Only. Though the Government’s regulations have compelled us to make lighter beers, the quality, taste and purity of O’Keefe’s brews remain unchanged. The same model brewery produces them—the same sanitary conditions are observed—and the same cleanliness in manufacture insisted on.

O’Keefe’s Imperial Beers. Lager. Ale. Stout.

Mild, light and pleasant, they are ideal as summer beverages.

O’Keefe’s ‘O.K.’ Brand and York Springs Ginger Ales on sale at all hotels, restaurants, and refreshment stands.

The O’Keefe Brewery Co. Limited.”