The Intelligencer December 4, 1917 (page 3)

“Why Many Officers Have to Return to Canada—Rigid Medical Examination. London. Not a few Canadian officers who have never been part and parcel of some unit and done service at the front are preparing to return to Canada sooner or later. Officers in this position who are above the rank of lieutenant, and who wish to stay on, must revert to lieutenants. This, however, is not the sole requisite. No man over thirty-four years of age may revert. And lastly, no man may stay on unless he passes the medical examination for general service.

Needless to say, the age and physical restrictions will weed out many who would otherwise have stepped down in rank. People of Canada should bear this in mind when officers return. If these officers are over 34, and not A1 medically, they have simply been sent home whether they wanted to go or not. And physical defects quite unapparent to the public will cause the Medical Board to turn down an officer.”

The Intelligencer December 4, 1917 (page 3)

“Help the Sailors! The strong, right arm of human civilization—the unconquerable sailor of the British Navy and Mercantile Marine—He stands before you and asks your help on Sailors’ Day, December 8th. Why does he do this?

Because millions have been given to the Army by public and private subscriptions—worthily so—but practically nothing to the Navy and Mercantile Marine.

Won’t you be generous on Sailors’ Day, Dec. 8th.”

The Intelligencer December 4, 1917 (page 7)

“No Xmas Parcels Can Go to Britain. Britain Bans Everything Except to Soldiers. Ottawa. The British Government has declined to permit entry from Canada into the United Kingdom of Christmas parcels for civilians. …

The Canadian High Commissioner cabled: ‘Department declines permit entry Christmas parcels for civilians. Will allow important parcels strictly limited weight and size for Canadian Expeditionary Force.”