The Intelligencer June 8, 1918 (page 3)

Poster for registration of women

“Woman’s Outlook on Canada’s Future. The splendid spirit and patriotic endeavour of Canadian women has been one of the outstanding features in Canada’s war effort. They have unsparingly given of their time and energy in the interest of the Red Cross and innumerable other activities which have come as a result of the war.

Thousands of Canadian women have been anxious to devote part, if not all of their time, in directions where their work would prove of advantage. Registration will be the means of bringing to these women the opportunity they have desired.

Every Woman. On June 22nd, every woman of sixteen years and over must attend at one of the places provided for registration between the hours of 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. and there truthfully answer all questions set forth upon the registration card. Failure to register means heavy penalties—as Registration is law.

Issued by authority of Canada Registration Board.”

The Intelligencer June 8, 1918 (page 7)

“Arrived Home. Pte. John Jones, 75 South John Street, arrived in the city yesterday after an absence of about 20 months overseas. He was wounded with gunshot in the right leg at the Battle of Passchendaele and it was necessary to have the leg amputated. Pte. Jones left Belleville with the 155th Battalion.”

The Intelligencer June 8, 1918 (page 7)

“A Pleasing Entertainment. The Albert College Dramatic Club under the direction of Miss Jessie Tuite, last evening at Madoc Village presented a play entitled ‘Down in Maine.’ At the Armouries, where the play was staged there was a large number present and all thoroughly enjoyed the drama. The entertainment was under the auspices of the I. O. O. F. of the village.”

[Note: I.O.O.F. = Independent Order of Odd Fellows.]

The Intelligencer June 8, 1918 (page 7)

“Awarded Military Medal. Mr. T. E. Hector, 190 Yeomans Street, has received information that his son, No. 637205 Pte. Sydney Frederick Hector, B Company, 2nd Batt., Canadian Infantry, France, has been awarded the Military Medal for meritorious conduct and strict devotion to duty, whilst on active service. This young man was wounded at the battle of Lens and fought at the two famous fights of Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele.

He is at present at a Canadian school of instruction in France, taking a special course in the famous Vickers Maxim Machine Gun, where he was when he was apprised of the above award, by the Major of his company and Brigadier of the 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade.”

The Intelligencer June 8, 1918 (page 7)

“Another Hero Home. Pte. James Dudley, whose home is on George street, in this city, arrived here yesterday, having been invalided home. He was severely wounded in France and as a result lost an arm. He left Belleville some months ago with the 155th Battalion.”

The Intelligencer June 8, 1918 (page 10)

Ad for Goodrich tires

“Who Began Trench Warfare? The trench, which always encircled the Roman castra, or camp, was brought to France by Julius Caesar and used by him on the very battlefield where to-day the Allies and the Huns have 25,000 miles of trenches.

Vauban, builder of Verdun, in 1673 employed the first parallel trenches, the system of the present war. Defeat, not foresight, turned the Germans to trench warfare. But Goodrich never had to dig in.

Since twenty-two years ago Goodrich manufactured the first American pneumatic automobile tire, Goodrich has driven ahead to the big, graceful, masterful—Goodrich Service/Value Tires.

The Belleville Vulcanizing Agency Exclusive Agents, 11 Moira Street. Phone 661.”