The Intelligencer July 26, 1917 (page 3)

“Do You Put Winning The War Ahead of Everything Else? Are you willing to have party politics dropped until after the war has been won? Do you believe that Canada must ‘carry on’ to the end, and support civilization with men, money, munitions and food? Ought every ability and activity of Canada to be devoted to winning the war? Are you determined that honor, duty and patriotism shall prevail over selfishness and indifference? Shall we support those sons, those brothers, those husbands, those fathers who are fighting for us at the front, and shall we send them the aid needed to save them from being killed alone and unaided?

Of course you answer YES. Then fill out and mail this coupon and get your friends to do the same. Win-The-War Convention, Toronto, August 2nd and 3rd, 1917.”

The Intelligencer July 26, 1917 (page 3)

“Enlist Your Kitchen in the War! ‘The kitchen must help as well as the workshop and the trenches’ Mr. Lloyd George has said it! What does he mean? He means you must know and practice real thrift—make every dollar you spend on food serve your family and your country. Banish those things which are wasteful and substitute real foods.

Thrift Suggests Serving Cocoa. Cowan’s Cocoa. ‘Perfection Brand’ Made in Canada.”

The Intelligencer July 26, 1917 (page 8)

“Appreciation of Musical Festival. While the extremely hot weather has to some extent marred the success of the Veterans Music Festival, those who go to the City Hall are pleasurably surprised at its coolness. The excellence of the work of Isolde Menges, and her associate artist Miss Eileen Beattie, accompanist, continues to evoke enthusiastic commendation. …

The programmes for the remaining nights cover a range of delightful classic selections with a generous sprinkling of popular airs. …  It is to be hoped that the remaining concerts will be attended in a way appropriate to the beauty of the music and the good of the cause.”

The Intelligencer July 26, 1917 (page 8)

“Overseas Boxes By Express, just received. Another lot of these splendid, strong, durable, steel sewn boxes for sending overseas. We have them in three sizes, and they sell at 15¢ and 20¢ each. Chas. S. Clapp.”