The Intelligencer October 30, 1916 (page 1)

“Recruiting Meeting at the Opera House. Griffin’s Opera House last night was filled to the doors with a Belleville audience, who had gathered at a recruiting meeting held under the auspices of the 235th Battalion. From the pit to the dome there was a sea of faces, and much interest was manifested in the addresses given, which were most inspiring.

The fine brass band of the battalion, under the capable leadership of Bandmaster Murchison, rendered a number of suitable selections, which were much appreciated, judging by the hearty applause at the conclusion of each number. …

Sergt. Mellor in his address said: “What is our part to do at the present time? Is it the giving of money? We need money, but we want men to go out and fight. We want the manly man, and this we know is hard to get. It means something of a mother to give up her sons. It means much to give up men, but we want them. It will mean sorrow at first, but glory afterwards. …

Lieut. Reid in his opening remarks said the returned soldiers bring but one message, and that message is, men and more men. This is our message to-night. …  There are enough young men in Belleville to fill up the 235th Battalion, and fill up another battalion. He appealed to all citizens in Belleville to assist in recruiting. …

Sergt. Dingwell, a returned hero, gave some thrilling episodes of the war, as seen and experienced by him. He had been thrice wounded and thrice gassed, and for days in the trenches was without enough to eat owing to their existing conditions. But despite all this, he was anxious to return. (Applause.) …  He was going back to help his comrades, and he was proud of the fact that he was going back with a Canadian battalion. (Applause.) …

At the conclusion of the address, upon invitation for recruits, two young men came forward, and expressed their desire to enlist. The meeting closed by a selection from the band.”

The Intelligencer October 30, 1916 (page 1)

“Cheesemen Guests of Red Cross Ladies. There are some seventeen Red Cross societies which receive aid from the Belleville Cheese Board, from a fund which is created by the giving of a day’s milk by the various patrons of the factories, which amounts to a considerable sum. The ladies connected with these societies are doing a noble work, and have already sent overseas a great amount of comforts for the boys in the trenches and those who have been wounded.

At St. Thomas’ Church Parish Hall on Saturday, the members of the Cheese Board were invited by the ladies to partake of a luncheon, and also to view the hundreds of articles they had provided to be sent to the boys as Christmas cheer. It was certainly an inspiring sight, and showed the handiwork of the ladies.

Previous to luncheon, which was served in the spacious dining apartments in the basement, the assembly in the auditorium was addressed briefly by Mayor Ketcheson, who spoke in glowing terms of the work done by the ladies.

After the singing of a patriotic hymn, those present adjourned to the dining hall, where a most tempting repast was partaken of. The menu was all that could have been desired, and it was superbly served by the ladies. The tables were decorated in such a manner as to represent red crosses.

At the conclusion of the luncheon, Mrs. Parsons, who has done excellent work in assisting to recruit for the 235th Battalion was called upon, and gave a most practical address. …

What a noble work the Red cross has done and is doing to help provide needs and comforts for the boys who are at the front fighting for us. The farmers must try and produce more, for more is required from the land than ever before. There must be a united effort to get all that is possible from the acreage sown. Patriotic production is a grand production. …

Mr. John Elliott, Manager of the Standard Bank, Belleville, who is also the treasurer of the Board’s Patriotic and Red Cross Fund, presented a financial statement which is indeed most creditable. …

Before adjourning, a vote of thanks was moved by Mr. Elliott, and seconded by Mr. McMullen, President of the Board, to Mrs. S. D. Lazier and all the ladies for providing the lunch and the good work they had accomplished.”

The Intelligencer October 30, 1916 (page 4)

“The 235th Regiment to Stay. A good deal of excitement existed in the city during the past week, owing to marching orders which had been issued by Militia authorities, in connection with the winter quartering of the 235th Regiment.

That regiment was sent to Belleville presumably, for the reason that no city in Ontario has better or more commodious quarters for one or two Regiments, and for the reason that the city through its energetic Mayor who always has its interests in view, pledged it to pay certain rentals for building if required for the accommodation of the officers and men, and that if the city declined to pay the rent he would pay it himself, but had had no doubt but that such expense would be willingly met.

On the arrival of the Regiment, every attention and courtesy was paid to officers and men, to make their stay among us as comfortable and pleasant as possible. The officers never for a moment, contemplated that in a few days marching orders would be issued to proceed elsewhere for winter quarters, leased furnished houses, for the rent of which they became personally responsible.

It is not surprising under such circumstances, that consternation prevailed in both city and camp, but, like true soldiers, they were ready to obey orders, and entrain and take up their new quarters wherever it might be.

These facts were without delay, brought under the notice of the Minister of Militia, who, upon being put in possession of them, recognized the impropriety from an economical and equitable standpoint, ordered marching instructions which had been given, cancelled without a moments hesitation. …

Belleville, let it be understood, has no rivalry with Cobourg or any other place which desired the wintering of the Regiment. …

It is well the Dominion has a practical man at the present important period of its history, at the head of Militia affairs, who, not only knows his duty but has the courage to perform it.”

The Intelligencer October 30, 1916 (page 6)

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“Overseas Christmas Cakes. Now is the time to order your Overseas Christmas Cakes for the boys at the front. We are making these up to order all the time. Chas. S. Clapp.”