The Intelligencer December 13, 1918 (page 5)

“Deseronto Soldier Won Military Medal. A Deseronto soldier, Pte. Sam Corby, attached to the 25th Canadian Battalion, has been awarded the military medal for outstanding bravery in keeping the lines of communication open under very heavy shell fire on the night of Sept. 28th, 1916, when he volunteered to act as a runner and made six trips and it was chiefly due to his bravery and determination that satisfactory communication was maintained was cited officially in the London Gazette of December 21, 1916, as follows:

‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the night of September 28, 1916, when acting as runner he volunteered and made six trips under very heavy shell fire when the runners had failed to find their way it was chiefly due to his bravery and determination that satisfactory communication was maintained.’

The following letter is self-explanatory: Department of Militia and Defence, 2nd Military District, 149 College St. Toronto Ont. Mrs. Mary Corby, Deseronto, Ont. Dear Madam,—in accordance with the wish expressed by (No. 412205) Pte. S. Corby, 25th Canadian Battalion, I beg to enclose herewith the military medal awarded to the above mentioned soldier by His Majesty the King. Enclose particulars of action for which this award was made. The congratulations of the Department are extended to you in the above mentioned soldier winning this coveted award. Kindly acknowledge receipt, D. B. Hrait, Lieut. For Assistant Adjt. Gen. Military District 2.

Pte. Sam Corby enlisted at Belleville in the 39th Battalion on February 25, 1915, and his many friends are pleased to learn that he has so gallantly distinguished himself on the field of battle.”

The Intelligencer December 13, 1918 (page 9)

“It Is Your Patriotic Privilege to save and conserve. When you eat wheat be sure it is the whole wheat. Don’t waste any of it. It is all food.

Shredded Wheat is the whole wheat—nothing wasted or thrown away. It is a nourishing wholesome substitute for meat, eggs, and other expensive foods. No sugar is required—simply milk and a dash of salt.”