The Intelligencer July 7, 1915 (pages 1, 2)

“Soldiers Suffering From Nervous and Mental Trouble. Ontario Physicians ask Gov’t to Equip Expedition of Doctors and Nurses. At the meeting of the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons, held in Toronto last week, the following resolution was carried amidst much enthusiasm: ‘Whereas it has become known to members …  that many of our soldiers in Europe are now suffering in special ways from various forms of nervous and mental trouble, due to the terrible shock of war. Whereas these various forms of nervous and mental diseases require special treatment, and that efforts are being put forth by those in authority to give this special treatment so far as the circumstances and conditions of war permit. Nevertheless, these circumstances and conditions are such as to render adequate treatment impossible. …

Therefore, be it resolved that this Council respectfully but urgently request the Government of this Province to at once equip an expedition of experienced and specially trained physicians and nurses from its public institutions and others specially qualified for such work and despatch them without delay with proper and full equipment to minister to those afflicted and restore them to convalescence and health; or where this is impossible or likely to be unduly prolonged, request the War Office to send them home to Canada, when suitable accommodation such as that soon available at Whitby be prepared for their reception and that this special treatment and nursing be there continued so long as may be required under the favorable conditions that such location, surroundings, and accommodation afford, and that a copy of this resolution be sent to Hon. W.H. Hearst, Premier of Ontario.’ …

The Council has touched upon a subject that has not received proper attention. This war differs from any incident of its character in the history of mankind. The huge mass of men engaged in the war arena, the power and strength of projectiles, the trench warfare, the aeroplane, the poisonous gases, the searchlights. …  Thus it is in this war we have a new type of ailment or of disability, or, if not altogether new, they are in number and variety far and away beyond anything heretofore recorded in the annals of war.

The character of these diseases is nervous and mental. We find loss of sight, hearing and speech without any apparent reason therefor. We find various forms of paralysis of arms, limbs, of parts of the body in large or small areas. There is loss of function of various organs, always distressing and often quite obscure. Standing out prominently we find many forms of mental disease, loss of memory, excitement, depression. …  the strain and horrors to which the soldier is exposed by day and night have resulted in an increase in insanity beyond anything yet recorded. …

Throughout the Province the suggestions of the Medical Council have been received with universal acclaim. In following the course outlined the Government would receive in full measure the support of the people of this Province.”