The Intelligencer November 27, 1918 (page 1)

“Thanksgiving Day On Sunday Next. Ottawa. Hon. Mr. Burrell, Secretary of State, is anxious that as great publicity as possible shall be given to the fact that Sunday, the 1st of December, has been named by proclamation as a day of solemn Thanksgiving to Almighty god for the victories won by the allied armies in the war against the Central Powers of Europe and for the armistice which has been signed by the contending nations involving a general surrender of the enemy.

Immediately after the signing of the armistice it was proposed that Sunday, 17th of November, be named as the day of thanksgiving, but the prevalence of Spanish influenza, particularly in the Western Provinces, rendered this impossible, as the churches in many districts were closed by order of the health authorities. In many places, however, the 17th was so observed.

On former occasions, it has been the practice of the State Department to notify the heads of religious denominations of days of prayer, but the shortness of the time did not permit of this course at this time.”

The Intelligencer November 27, 1918 (page 7)

“Shipment for Overseas. The Myrehall Red Cross met at the home of Mrs. E. C. Carter on November the 7th, thirteen members being present. The following were sent to Foxboro: 2 quilts, 16 day-shirts, 9 suits of pyjamas, 6 pairs of socks, 37 towels, 9 Xmas boxes, check for $15.”

The Intelligencer November 27, 1918 (page 7)

“Lt. Desislet Wounded. Lieut. Allan C. Desislet of Toronto, is reported wounded. He enlisted as a Pte. in the 123rd Battalion of Toronto, was transferred to the C. M. R.’s, and went to France in July 1916 and gained his commission on the field. Lieut. Desislet was born in Belleville twenty years ago and resided here until 1911, when he went to Toronto. He attended Grier Street School in this city, and is a nephew of Mrs. H. Brown 2nd Concession of Sidney. His parents reside at 93 Millicent St., Toronto.”