100 Years Ago: How to Address Letters to Soldiers

The Intelligencer August 30, 1915 (page 2)

“Many Letters to Soldiers Mis-Sent. ‘Address the letters to the soldiers carefully,’ writes an officer of the Canadian Postal Corps, at Shorncliffe ‘as over 300 ‘blind’ letters come to my hands for tracing every day. It is very difficult, and delay is caused when the units and the regimental numbers are not given. The addresses on some of the letters would make you laugh, others make you tear your hair. Some I must trace by the least clue, such as the Canadian post mark of a certain town. A French name would of course first be traced through the corps where Frenchmen predominate. …

If people would take the care and trouble to write the Battalion or Battery, it would save us endless trouble. Numerous letters come, though carefully stating the soldiers’ name, number, platoon, company and contingent but not a sign of the Battalion to which he belongs. One might just as well address a letter to Pte. B. Jones, No. 4562 Canadians.

I wish the newspapers would be kind enough to call attention to this so as to give the friends and relatives of soldiers the hint to be sure to put the Battalion or Battery on the envelopes. Few letters would then go astray.’ “

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100 Years Ago: Ad for McLaughlin Carriage Company

The Intelligencer August 28, 1915 (page 12)

“What the Siege Guns Teach. These diagrams of a modern siege gun and the three different types of automobile engine valves in general use clearly reveal the logic of the “Valve-in-head” principle in automobile construction. …  Branch at Belleville, P.J. Lee Mgr. McLaughlin Carriage Co. Limited. 1916 Models $1,085, $1,385, $1,325, $2,125.”

McLaughlin Carriage Company advertisement

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100 Years Ago: Thurlow Patriotic Meeting, Ad for Grape Nuts

The Intelligencer August 27, 1915 (page 1)

“Patriotic Meeting at Thurlow. One of the most interesting and enthusiastic patriotic meetings ever held in this section was that conducted under the auspices of the Queen Mary Patriotic Club which assembled in the grounds and school of the Third Concession of Thurlow on Thursday evening, the 26th inst. Under the capable leadership of their energetic President, Miss Laura Phelps, the ladies had made every provision for the comfort and pleasure of their guests, so under the circumstances it is not to be wondered at when we say all present thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

Splendid music was furnished by the Foxboro band and patriotic songs were sung by Messrs. S.C. Gay and Bruce Martin, and interesting and instructive addresses were delivered. …  The meeting closed by the singing of the National Anthem and cheers for the army, navy and ladies of the Queen Mary Patriotic Club.”

The Intelligencer August 27, 1915 (page 3)

“Food for the Business Trenches. It takes the highest type of nerve and endurance to stand the strain at the battle front of modern business. Many fail. And often the cause is primarily a physical one—improper food—malnutrition. It is a fact that much of the ordinary food is lacking in certain elements—the mineral salts—which are essential to right building of muscle, brain and nerve tissue.

Grape-Nuts Food made of whole wheat and barley, contains these priceless nerve- and brain-building elements in highest degree.”

Grape Nuts advertisement

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100 Years Ago: Roslin Recruiting and Patriotic Meeting

The Intelligencer August 25, 1915 (page 2)

“Recruiting Meeting Held at Roslin. Inspiring Addresses—Goodly Sum Donated by the Red Cross Society. At Roslin last night a recruiting and patriotic meeting was held, which was largely attended by the residents of that locality. Mr. John Elliott of this city was chairman and filled the position in his usual affable and able manner. …

The addresses were of a high order and were most patriotic in sentiment. The sum of $125 was realized and this amount will be applied for Red Cross work. During the evening and after each address vocal selections were rendered, which were not only of a patriotic nature but most pleasing. The gathering was in every respect a success and will no doubt have a tendency to inspire recruiting.”

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100 Years Ago: Shannonville Greets 8th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Trek to Belleville a Success

The Intelligencer August 20, 1915 (page 3)

“Shannonville. On Monday when the 8th Mounted Rifles arrived at Shannonville they were greeted with a great surprise. Villagers and the farmers from the neighboring country gathered there to give them a ‘send-off’ before they left for Kingston. Each family brought refreshments and a big dinner was prepared. Before leaving, each soldier was presented with a pair of socks. The soldiers stirred up the patriotism of the young men and secured two recruits.

The soldiers very much appreciated these remembrances and were loud in their praise of the thoughtfulness of the residents of Shannonville and district.”

The Intelligencer August 20, 1915 (page 3)

“Barriefield Camp. The 8th C.M.R. are back again in camp after covering a trek of fully 100 miles. …  They are loud in their praise of the treatment accorded them in nearly every place they passed through, and are more than anxious for another trek to the same place. Already there is a big increase in the mail bag from Napanee and Belleville, and a vigorous correspondence has commenced which may terminate, in many cases in matrimonial conclusions. Several of the officers and men plead guilty to a lonely and longing feeling since coming back to camp, and this usually indicates serious disturbance of the heart and mind.

The trek to Belleville is bearing some real fruit, outside of the experience of the men and horses. About 25 recruits are expected in camp in a few days as one of the results, and the first batch of six have already reported. …  The people from the country should be given a chance to see what a well-trained force of men looks like when in training for war. Kingston Standard.”

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100 Years Ago: Officers Cruise on Bay of Quinte, Soldiers Given Socks, Recruits Wanted, Intelligencer Tobacco Fund

The Intelligencer August 16, 1915 (page 1)

“Officers Entertained. The officers of the 8th C.M.R. were entertained by Mr. F.E. O’Flynn on Saturday afternoon by a cruise in his launch ‘Allie Dale.’ Col. Ketcheson of the 49th also assisted in making it pleasant for the guests.

The officers met together at the Hotel Quinte, were taken to the dock and proceeded up the Bay to Trenton, going up on the north side and coming down on the south side of the bay, running down to Big Bay, making a cruise of all together about 40 miles. The officers very much enjoyed the trip. The day was a delightful one and it was the expression of all the officers that the scenery could not be surpassed.”

The Intelligencer August 16, 1915 (page 1)

“Socks for Soldiers. The ladies of the Patriotic and Red Cross Association decided on Saturday afternoon to present the officers and members of the 8th C.M.R. each with a pair of their socks. Thousands have been sent to the front by our ladies but they thought that when an opportunity came of giving them to the boys on the ground it would be a good thing to do.

A committee composed of Mrs. Col. Lazier, President, Mrs. F.E. O’Flynn, Convenor of Camp Supplies and Mrs. Dr. Yeomans, Convenor of the Knitting Circles, had parcels neatly prepared and marked for the respective squadron for machine gun section and band, and took them to the Head Quarters on the Fair Grounds and placed them in charge of the Orderly Officer. The socks were distributed this morning before the Regiment left for Kingston and no doubt will be fully appreciated by the officers and members of the regiment

The ladies are to be congratulated on their thoughtfulness in this move but it is only in a line with what they have been doing since the war broke out.

The citizens have been very much pleased with the visit of this unit and the appearance of the officers and men has won the admiration of the citizens while their conduct without exception has been such as to bring high credit to the organization.”

The Intelligencer August 16, 1915 (page 2)

“Recruits Wanted. 34th Battery, Field Artillery. The organization of three new overseas batteries in this Division offers an exceptional opportunity for young men to enlist in the most desirable branch of the Military Service. Pay and Separation allowance from date of enlistment; also share of Patriotic Fund. Apply: 34th Battery Recruiting Officer, Recruiting Tent, Armouries Lawn.”

Recruits Wanted 34th Battery

The Intelligencer August 16, 1915 (page 2)

“The Intelligencer Tobacco Fund. Parcels Despatched. The amount contributed by the readers of The Intelligencer to our Tobacco Fund was $47.10. The lady who kindly undertook the task of making the purchases expended the whole of the sum in Belleville stores with the exception of 49 cents. This we have handed over to Miss Wilmot, who is collecting for a machine gun. …

We must thank our readers for having so promptly responded to our appeal on behalf of the Belleville lads, who we are sure will fully appreciate their generosity.”

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100 Years Ago: Dick Ponton Arrives Home, 8th Canadian Mounted Rifles Welcomed

The Intelligencer August 14, 1915 (page 2)

“Capt. Dick Ponton Home from Front. Rousing Welcome to Young Belleville Officer in Early Hours of This Morning. A telegram was received in Belleville last evening, saying that Capt. Dick Ponton would arrive at the G.T.R. station at 2 o’clock this morning. The news quickly spread, and a large crowd of friends and acquaintances were at the station and gave the gallant young officer a rousing welcome. The band of the 15th Regiment was present, and played Capt. Ponton to the corner of Bridge and Front streets. This brought hundreds more from their beds, and the city presented a most unwonted sight for such an early hour of the morning. …

Lieut. Col. Marsh, the officers of the 15th Battalion, and the Regimental Band, accompanied by a cheering crowd of well-wishers in civilian clothes, escorted the Captain in seven or eight automobiles to Front street. Despite the fact that Capt. Ponton is exceedingly lame and that he was obviously fatigued by his journey, he made a short speech at the station, and thanked his friends for their hearty welcome. ‘I hope to be able to take back 300 recruits with me,’ he said amidst cheers, while voices called out ‘We’ll be with you, Ponton.’

HC02358

Captain Richard Douglas Ponton

Arrived at the corner of Front and Bridge streets the young Captain made another short speech. ‘Why, Front street is paved!’ he remarked, a sally which was greeted with laughter and cheers.

It was a thoroughly genuine welcome home, which the officer, invalided home, thoroughly deserved; and it is to be hoped that Belleville will accord a similar greeting to all the other heroes who return from the war.”

 

 

The Intelligencer August 14, 1915 (page 2)

“8th C.M.R. Arrive In Belleville. Mayor and Council Accord Them a Civic Welcome. The 8th Canadian Mounted Rifles, in training at Barriefield Camp, concluded their fifty-mile march yesterday and arrived at Belleville about 5 o’clock. They left Kingston Thursday and broke the journey at the half-way point, Napanee.

Arrived at Belleville the soldiers proceeded by way of Foster avenue and Bridge street to the Agricultural grounds, where they will stay until Monday. Mayor W.H. Panter, ex-Mayor Wills and several other prominent civilians motored out to the city limits to meet the mounted infantry, and their own Pipe Band, on foot. Col. Ketcheson and others gave them the only military reception.

The Mayor, in a few brief words, extended a hearty welcome from the citizens of Belleville, and hoped the soldiers would have a pleasant time during their stay here. Lieut. Col. Monroe, in command of the regiment, thanked the Mayor and citizens for their kindness, to himself, the officers and men. Some distance out of the city the road was lined with spectators, but on Bridge street the crowd was enormous. Everywhere our soldier visitors attracted the highest admiration, and no doubt the event will assist recruiting in a marked degree. …

Shortly after the evening meal had been provided by the Army Service Corps, the men were dismissed. Later on Front street had again a large mixture of khaki with its other colors.”

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100 Years Ago: 8th Canadian Mounted Rifles March to Belleville, Piper’s Band Precedes Regiment

The Intelligencer August 13, 1915 (page 2)

“8th C.M.R. March to Belleville. Will Arrive in City From Napanee This Evening. At 8:30 a.m. yesterday, Kingston citizens who were on Princess street, saw something which has probably never before been seen on Kingston Sts. It was the 8th Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, under Lieut-Col. J.R. Munro in full war regalia on the start of a hundred mile march through the country. Every man was mounted. The men were in their shirt sleeves, and ‘business’ was the word they suggested. On each horse the rider took with him his blanket, rifle, mess-tin, water bottles and bandoliers. …

The route taken to Belleville was along Ontario street to Princess street and straight out to Napanee. At the exhibition grounds in Napanee it was planned to spend the night.”

The Intelligencer August 13, 1915 (page 2)

“Official Reception. Front street, before the City Hotel this morning, about half-past eleven o’clock, was the scene of a very inspiring series of musical selections. The musicians were the Piper’s Band of the 8th C.M.R. of Barriefield, who preceded their regiment to Belleville by train. The band includes 4 pipers and several drummers, all adepts with their instruments. The pipers, while not in Highland regalia, do not look out of place, the spurs, bandoliers and khaki serving in please of kilt and sporan.

After treating their audience to an impromptu concert the boys from Barriefield marched to their headquarters, to await the coming of their comrades.”

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100 Years Ago: Baldwin Ward Recruiting Rally, 8th Mounted Rifles Recruit, Thomasburg Patriotic Meeting

The Intelligencer August 11, 1915 (page 2)

“Recruiting Rally in Baldwin Ward. The attendance at the Baldwin ward Recruiting Rally last night, was the largest yet. Over eight hundred men women and children were there, sitting on chairs, or standing on the beautiful lawn. …

Mr. O’Flynn, when called upon, spoke right to the point, and was listened to with the more eagerness as he has a son, (Capt. O’Flynn) over in Flanders fighting for the Empire. …  Belleville and the County of Hastings had nothing to be proud of. They had not stood up with other townships and cities of equal size. They had been so self-centred that they had no time for the national danger. But the Belleville boys who had gone had proven equal to the best. They were boys to be proud of,—all trumps. Those who left now, deserve double praise, for they know their danger and were bravely facing it. This war makes men of the boys who went.

‘We must send on a never ending stream of reinforcements,’ concluded the speaker ‘to drive the heathen back. Stand by the right, send on our boys. God will protect them, and in the future, when we tell of the part Belleville took in the Big War, it will be with honest pride and satisfaction.’ (Applause).

Mr. J.W. Johnson, M.P.P., gave a very interesting address which was listened to with close interest. …  The serious peril facing the country is the supreme cause now; nothing else can be allowed to stand in the way of the Empire’s defence. …  At the meeting at which the recruiting campaign was started and also at other meetings of men for patriotic purposes those present were often obliged to ask what men are holding back who should be with us in our efforts. We wondered at the indifference of some of the ministers and still have cause to wonder. It is not too late for their influence to be exerted, the cause needs it and who should render more willing or could render greater service?”

The Intelligencer August 11, 1915 (page 3)

“Men Wanted! The 8th Mounted Rifles Want Recruits. Apply to Lieut. D.M. McCarger Inside Armouries.”

Men Wantred 8th Mounted Rifles

The Intelligencer August 11, 1915 (page 7)

“Patriotic Meeting at Thomasburg. Over 500 people gathered in the beautifully decorated grounds of the church at Thomasburg on Monday evening and blazing bonfires of white pine erected on concrete pillars like beacon fires, made the scene most romantic and picturesque. …  Over $100 was taken at the gate by the Women’s Institute and over $60 at the booth. Dainty refreshments were served.

Mr. Elliott as chairman introduced each speaker felicitously with current comment of his own. …  Mr. Ketcheson made a rousing recruiting speech appealing directly to the boys to shoulder their responsibilities. …  Rev. Mr. Richards is a new asset of the Church militant and Thomasburg is to be congratulated on the young and vigorous minister. …  Colonel Ponton brought the traditions of the past to bear upon the duties of the present. …

The townships of Hungerford and Huntingdon were well represented at this most enthusiastic gathering which is only one link in a great campaign.”

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100 Years Ago: Murney Ward Recruiting Rally

The Intelligencer August 7, 1915 (page 3)

“Recruiting Rally In Murney Ward. A fine recruiting meeting under the auspices of the Belleville Speakers’ Patriotic League was held last evening at Queen Mary School in West Belleville. The spacious assembly room of the school was filled with ladies, men and children, who evidently took much interest in the proceedings. Previous to the meeting the 15th Regiment band discoursed a number of patriotic selections, playing upon the lawn in front of the school.

It was an inspiring audience that greeted Mr. W.A.G. Hardy, chairman of the ward committee, when he arose as the presiding officer to open the meeting. He was, as he expressed himself, delighted at the manner in which the residents of the ward had turned out. …  Col. Ketcheson spoke briefly, referring to the fact that he was present because his heart was in the matter. …

Rev. Dr. Blagrave, Rector of Christ Church, was next called upon and he gave a most interesting and inspiring address. He referred to the pleasure it gave him to be present and address a gathering from Murney Ward. It was every man’s duty to do what he could at the present time for his country. …  Some young men are not enlightened as they should be as to the seriousness of this great war. It is a serious conflict; of that there is not the slightest doubt. We are wiser than we were a year ago, wiser as to our resources, and wiser as to the resources of the enemy. …

Mr. E.G. Porter, K.C., M.P., was the last speaker, and whilst his remarks were of a brief nature they were to the point. He explained why the meetings were being held in the various wards of the city. If was felt throughout the city that the young men were not responding with that alacrity with which they should respond; not that they were cowards, but the needs of the situation were not thoroughly understood. …  There is only one way to make this war end the way we desire it to end, and that is by the young men enlisting. We want men behind the guns, and we want young men. They can perform this service better than older men. …

On motion of Mayor Panter, seconded by Col. Ponton, a vote of thanks was tendered to the 15th Regiment band and those who had assisted in the programme. The proceedings closed by the singing of the National Anthem.”

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