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100 Years Ago: Spanish Influenza Deemed Not Alarming, Ad for Sinclair’s, Collection for Soldiers’ Christmas Gifts, Army and Navy Veterans Association, Philip Henry Wills Wounded, Theatre Collection

The Intelligencer September 25, 1918 (page 1)

“Influenza Outbreak Is Not Alarming. Toronto. ‘There is altogether too much made of the seriousness of this Spanish influenza,’ declared Dr. McCullough, Provincial Officer of Health. ‘The epidemic is not so serious as measles, and while a few deaths have occurred among the Poles at Camp Niagara, everything possible has been done to prevent its spread.’

‘As far as I can learn, there is no pathological difference between plain influenza and the so-called Spanish variety,’ said Dr. Hastings today. ‘The symptoms are practically the same.’

Mr. Shutt, who is in charge of the division of contagious diseases, reported that so far the department had received no indication from private physicians or its own inspectors that there were any cases of Spanish influenza in the city.”

The Intelligencer September 25, 1918 (page 2)

Ad for Sinclair's

“Sinclair’s. At the Front. During the past twenty-five years through all Fashion’s fancies in weaves, colors and fabrics, Priestleys’ Dress Goods have been, as it were, at the front.

This year—it’s blacks and blues and plain colors—Priestleys’ have them in different fabrics, but all in the same high grade and famous quality.”

The Intelligencer September 25, 1918 (page 5)

“The Soldiers’ Christmas. An extra added attraction during the presentation of ‘Have a Heart’ at Griffin’s last evening was the taking up of a collection from the audience between the acts for Christmas gifts for the boys ‘over there.’ The collection was under the auspices of the Quinte Chapter, Daughters of the Empire, and the collectors were the girls of the company, while Joseph Keno (‘Henry’) the chief laugh provoker of the play, appeared before the curtain and in a humorous way speeded up the shower of small change which will help to add brightness to many a soldiers Christmas in the war zone. The collection was a distinct success.”

The Intelligencer September 25, 1918 (page 5)

“Army and Navy Veterans. A branch of the Army and Navy Veterans Association of Canada is being organized in Belleville by Capt. Mouck of Kingston, chief organizer for Eastern Canada. Capt. Mouck is meeting success in his canvass for members who will include veterans of the present war, South Africa, Riel Rebellion and Fenian Raid.

It is proposed to secure club rooms for the organization to be open at all times to members. The object of the association of Army and Navy Veterans is to care for the soldier and his dependents. One of the first charter members to sign the roll in Belleville was Mr. Alexander Foxton, 49 Herkimer street, over eighty years of age, who is a Fenian Raid veteran.

The society is incorporated by Act of Parliament and the patrons include the King and Queen, H. R. H. the Duke of Connaught, His Excellency the Right Honorable the Duke of Devonshire, K. C., C. C. M. G., C. C. U. O., P. C., and Lord Aberdeen.”

The Intelligencer September 25, 1918 (page 5)

“Severely Wounded. Lieut. P. H. Wills, nephew of Judge Wills, of this city, who was wounded in the Arras push, has been transferred from the Red Cross hospital, France, to one of the London, England, hospitals. ‘Fay,’ as he is familiarly known in Belleville, received a severe wound in the knee, having been hit by a large piece of shrapnel just after his company had obtained their objective.”

The Intelligencer September 25, 1918 (page 5)

“$84.02 Theatre Collection. Through the courtesy of Mr. Forhan Manager of Griffin’s Opera House, and the ‘Have a Heart Company,’ and the liberality of the audience, a collection taken up during last night’s performance realized the sum of $84.02 for the Quinte Chapter I. O. D. E., which will be used for the comforts of our boys overseas.”

By | September 25th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Tips to Avoid Spanish Influenza, Letter of Sympathy for William Woods’s Wife, Poster for Thrift, Y.M.C.A. Beaver Hut in London

The Intelligencer September 24, 1918 (page 1)

“Dr. Hastings’ Tips To Avoid Influenza. Toronto. Now that Spanish influenza has crossed the ocean to America and is spreading so rapidly over this continent, Dr. C. J. O. Hastings, M. O. H., counsels the public to observe the following …  safeguards against contracting the disease.

Avoid needless crowding; influenza is a crowd disease. Smother your coughs and sneezes, others do not want the germs which you would throw away. Your nose, not your mouth, was made to breathe through. Get the habit. Remember the three C’s—A clean mouth, a clean skin and clean clothes. Try to keep cool when you walk and warm when you ride and sleep. Open the windows always at home at night; at the office when practicable.”

The Intelligencer September 24, 1918 (page 5)

“Premier’s Sympathy. Mrs. Susanna Woods, residing at 20 Water Street, city, is in receipt of the following telegram: ‘The Prime Minister and members of the Government of Canada send their deepest sympathy in the bereavement which you have sustained.’ This refers to her husband, Pte. William Woods, who was killed in action on September 2nd.”

[Note: Private William Woods died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 526 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 24, 1918 (page 5)

Poster for thrift

“Keeping up with the Joneses. One great bar to the practice of thrift to-day is the tendency to let others set for us our standards of living. Mrs. Jones appears on the street in a new gown and at once her neighbour vows she’ll have one like it. Or if a new motor car is delivered to a certain home, a nearby family, not to be handicapped in the social race, plan to discard their old car for a new one.

Such silly rivalry is bad enough indeed in normal periods. It is positively unpatriotic in times like these when the country needs all available labor and material and every available dollar with which to carry on the war.

For the money we spend in satisfying these desires represents equipment, clothing, shot and shell that are so urgently needed for our boys in France.

Published under the authority of the Minister of Finance of Canada.”

The Intelligencer September 24, 1918 (page 6)

“Comfort in London For Canadian Soldier. A bed, including bath, towel, soap and kit storage in London costs the Canadian Tommy 18 cents—that is if he goes to the new Canadian Y.M.C.A. ‘Beaver Hut’ in the Strand. A meal costs him the same with the strains of an orchestra thrown in.

Needless to relate our boys overseas are ‘tickled to death’ with their new metropolitan centre. Costing $100,000 and situated in the most famous thoroughfare in the Empire, the Beaver Hut is run primarily by the Canadians for Canadians, although its hospitality is free to all the men of the allied forces on leave visiting London.

A voluntary staff of 200 ladies, superintended by Miss Helen Fitzgerald of Fredericton, N.B., attend to the preparation and service of meals. Dormitories, with nearly 200 beds are under the same efficient care, and the ladies work in four-hour shifts, maintaining a twenty-four hour service. No matter at what hour a tired and hungry Canadian soldier arrives in London he finds an open door, a smiling welcome, and a hot meal at the ‘Beaver Hut.’ ”

 

 

By | September 24th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Canadian Deaths from Spanish Influenza, Canadian Casualties, David James McGlashon Killed in Action, Letter of Sympathy for William Hunter’s Mother, Memorial Service at Salvation Army Citadel, Ad for Wrigley’s

The Intelligencer September 23, 1918 (page 1)

“Several Deaths From Spanish Influenza. Toronto. Spanish influenza has claimed five victims, who died in the Polish infantry camp at Niagara and there are 168 soldiers suffering from this disease there at present. The Canadian camp has not yet been attacked, although there are many cases of severe colds there. Quebec despatch today tells of the closing and quarantining of the college at Victoriaville, Que., on account of the influenza there. Two of the teaching staff and one student having succumbed. Nine sailors on ships in port at Quebec have died during the last few days of this disease.”

The Intelligencer September 23, 1918 (page 2)

“Many Heroes Fell. No casualty list issued since the Canadians made their great drive into the German lines below Amiens has so emphasized the price of victory as that sent over the wires Sunday night. The lists for days past have been long, but most of the names have been those of men wounded. Last night’s roll of honor was remarkable for the number of men reported killed in action. The men whose names appeared there came from every part of the Dominion, from the Maritime Provinces to the Pacific coast, not a few of them being Quebecers. Among fallen were a number whose names are in Hastings and Prince Edward County.”

The Intelligencer September 23, 1918 (page 2)

“Pte. D. J. McGlashon Killed. A few days ago Sergt. and Mrs. McGlashon of this city received a message that their son, Pte. David James McGlashon, was wounded and missing. Today they were in receipt of another message which conveyed the sad intelligence that he was killed in action on August 11th.

Pte. McGlashon enlisted and went overseas with the 155th Battalion from Belleville. Subsequently he was transferred to another unit and had been in France for some time. The brave young soldier was well known in Belleville, where he had many friends. To the bereaved parents will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of all citizens. An elder brother is at present home suffering from severe wounds received in action.”

[Note: Private David James McGlashon died on August 11, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 458 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 23, 1918 (page 5)

“Sympathy of Premier. Mrs. James Hunter is in receipt of the following: ‘The Prime Minister and members of the Government of Canada send their deepest sympathy in the bereavement which you have sustained.’ This refers to her son Pte. W. Hunter, who was recently recorded among that great silent army of heroes who have made the supreme sacrifice for Canada.”

[Note: Private William Hunter died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 433 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 23, 1918 (page 5)

“Memorial Service. A very large crowd, completely filling the auditorium of the S. A. Citadel, was present at the Memorial Service of Ptes. H. Carter and G. Thibault, who last week were killed in action. Mrs. B. W. Brown, who has charge of the Sunday School work sang and expressed the sympathy of the members of the school to which the children attended. Adjt. Trickey spoke of the words of David, ‘There is a step between me and death.’

A very impressive service was held, and a number of persons held up their hands for prayers on their behalf. There are 32 men, soldiers and adherents who have left from the S. A. in Belleville. Five have been killed, eight or ten wounded and one is now a prisoner in Germany. A special service of prayer is being held this afternoon at the Citadel on behalf of the allies.”

The Intelligencer September 23, 1918 (page 5)

Ad for WRigley's gum

“Wrigley’s. Any Way You Turn you will find WRIGLEY’S. Everybody thinks of Wrigley’s when chewing gum is mentioned. This is the result of years of effort to give mankind the benefits and enjoyment of this low-cost sweetmeat.

Wrigley’s helps appetite and digestion—allays thirst—renews vigour. Sealed tight—kept right. The Flavour Lasts.”

By | September 23rd, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Coal Enough If Care Taken, Families Without Coal, Spanish Influenza Under Control, Campaign for Army Huts, Power of Dollars, Patriot or Shirker, Depot Battalion to Arrive, Weather Poor for Farmers, Gasless Sunday Tomorrow, Memorial Service for Privates Carter and Thibault, Great War Veterans Support Army Huts Campaign, Poster for Thrift

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 1)

“Coal Enough If It Is Husbanded. Ottawa. Unless the coming winter is one of exceptional severity the supply of coal available for use in Canada, in the opinion of Fuel Controller C. A. Magrath, should be sufficient if properly husbanded. Of anthracite coal Canada’s allotment is somewhat smaller this year than last, but of bituminous coal some 1,200,000 tons more are being brought into the country. …  Municipal authorities, he holds, must do their part by appointing fuel controllers to ensure proper distribution of coal available for consumption in their own localities. …

Representatives of firms engaged in the manufacture of musical instruments, automobiles, liquors and clay products were here to-day conferring together and with the Fuel Controller respecting the manner in which the proposed limitation of coal consumption by those industries is to be carried out.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 2)

“Families Without Coal. To The Editor of The Intelligencer: Dear Sir:—It is reasonably certain that there are many families in the City of Belleville without fuel at the present time.

Would it not be a good suggestion for the editors of both papers to select five representative citizens in each ward and ask them to make a canvass of the poorer class of people in their ward with a view of ascertaining what supply of coal they have on hand, what their requirements for the year would be, why they have made no purchases? etc. After this information has been ascertained a report to the Local Fuel Controller could be made with a view to supplying the needs of these citizens. …  In collecting this information special attention should be given to the needs of soldiers’ wives. Yours truly, W. E. Shuster.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 3)

“Spanish Influenza Now Under Control. Toronto. ‘The department is doing everything possible to check the outbreak of Spanish influenza which was reported to us from the Polish camp at Niagara, and we feel that we have this new but aggravating complaint well under control,’ was the statement made by Col. J. W. S. McCullough, Chief officer of the Provincial Board of Health.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 4)

“Last Call—Is Your Name Written There? The campaign to raise funds for the Knights of Columbus Army Comfort Huts for the soldiers on the firing line has swept forward with enthusiasm and success. The publicity part of the local campaign is in charge of Mr. W. L. Doyle, who has been so successful in previous campaigns for various patriotic purposes, and as a result of Mr. Doyle’s ability and novel advertising methods no one who can read will be able to say that the aims and objects of the campaign were not strikingly brought forth. …  What we owe the brave soldier boys can never be measured in money and the slogan of ‘Give, Give, Give ‘Till it Hurts’ is but a reminder of one more opportunity to pay a small installment on our great debt to our soldier protectors. …

There are no creed barriers on the battlefield and only one God to bless the religion of service in the great cause of humanity. The K. of C. workers are welcomed beside the Y.M.C.A. and Salvation Army and all will work in perfect harmony and co-operation ministering to the needs of the soldiers and by their unselfish services inspiring the soldier to even greater efforts in the cause of world freedom. …

This is the last day of the Drive and those who have not as yet given in their subscriptions can do so this evening at Campaign Headquarters, corner of Bridge and Front Streets.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 4)

“The Power of the Dollar. Never were extravagances and useless buying regarded as so serious an evil as today. A greater evil still is the spending of one’s money on silly pleasures. Canadians carry too serious a determination to ride through to Victory and to vindicate the stalwartness and endurance of the men at the front to tolerate any such laxity in their expenditures.

Our people generally are sizing up the power of the dollar as never before, and are investing their surpluses against a possible landslide after the war. This is real patriotism. It is carrying common-sense into national business. It is proving that the strength of a nation lies in her saving citizens.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 4)

“The Patriot or The Shirker. To save and serve or to spend and shirk—that is the question. If we decide—as we will—on saving and serving, then we must cut down on all luxuries to the limit.

Motoring for pleasure is a luxury. Most of the Sunday motoring is for pleasure, and as long as the Fuel Controller asks us to desist from Sunday motoring, it is our patriotic duty to respond.

By refraining from pleasure-motoring to-morrow we discharge a double duty. We save the gasoline needed overseas. We save the money which Canada must have to finish the war. The car in the garage tomorrow is the Patriot’s car. The car on the Highway, if there for pleasure, is the car of the Shirker. Which is YOURS?”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Soldiers Next Week. The Depot Battalion, which is being transferred from Kingston to Belleville, did not arrive yesterday as anticipated, quarters not being quite ready for them. They will arrive early next week.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Anxiety for Farmers. The past couple of weeks have been anxious ones for the farmers in this section, many of whom have a great deal of grain in the fields yet. Wheat is commencing to sprout and the straw will be almost useless for feed. While the weather does not look any too favorable yet it gives promise of improving and a few days of sunshine would change the aspect considerably.—Bancroft Times.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Everybody Walks But—the call comes strong and insistent from those in a position to know that there is urgent necessity to save gasoline for war purposes. This is not the time to argue the pros and cons of Sunday pleasure riding in automobiles. Canadians are placed upon their honor and requested to save gasoline tomorrow by cutting out the use of motor cars except for deeds of necessity and mercy. …  Let’s make it unanimous and ALL WALK. What say? Yes, of course—YES!”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Memorial Service. A memorial service will be held at the S. A. Citadel on Sunday evening next at 7 p.m. for Ptes. Carter and Thibault, who were both killed in action this week. They were adherents of the Salvation Army and the wives and family reside in the city, the former on Boswell street and the latter on Murney street.”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 7)

“War Veterans Endorse K. of C. Army Hut Fund. Toronto, Sept. 20, 1918. E. D. O’Flynn, Esq., Standard Bank Chambers, Belleville, Ont. Dear Comrade:

The following letter was given to the representative of the Knights of Columbus in the City of Toronto, after consultation with the President and Vice-President: ‘We who have shared in the mud, misery and blood of trench warfare know the need of such aid to courage and endurance as the Knights of Columbus Huts afford to the soldiers over there. We have no hesitation in urging Canadians to support the work. …  The folks who give the last cent of their last dollar for the welfare of the boys over there have given less than the man who gives his life.

The Great War Veterans Association in Ontario will support and encourage the money raising campaign of the Knights of Columbus.’

I regret the matter was so urgent I was unable to consult all the members of the Executive before making a departure from our policy to withhold endorsation of the work of other organizations, but I trust the worthy nature of this endeavor will lead to your approval of my action in this matter. Yours fraternally, W. E. Turley. Sec. G.W.V.A. (Ont. Prov. Branch).”

The Intelligencer September 21, 1918 (page 9)

Poster for thrift

“Fellow Canadians! How much thought do you give to the War—I mean honest, sincere thought on how we should live in order to win the war?

You have no idea what it means to stand knee-deep in mud—in a dirty trench—with a cold drizzle chilling you to the bone. But you know these things are.

And we—the soldiers who make those armies. Do you think we could ‘carry-on’ if we thought for a moment you were not backing us to the limit?

If you could know—as I know—all that war means—you’d stint yourselves down to the barest necessities—so that Canada’s money and Canada’s material and Canada’s labor could all go into guns and shells and boots and uniforms and food—for our boys over in France to fight with.

Published under the authority of the Minister of Finance of Canada.”

 

 

By | September 21st, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Private Roy Buck Killed in Action, Army Huts Campaign Total Climbs, Frank Sweet Killed in Action, Howard Black Dies of Wounds, Spanish Flu Enters Ontario, Letter from Nursing Sister for A. E. Baldwin, Salvation Army Campaign, Soldiers Arrive in Belleville, George Thibault Killed in Action, William Neilson Casselman Five Times Wounded

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 1)

Roy Buck

“Killed in Action. Private Roy Buck. A former member of the Ritchie staff, killed in action on September 3, 1918. His mother resides at 18 Everett Street.”

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 5)

“K. of C. Army Hut Fund Reaches $3,200. With one day left in which to obtain the objective of $5,000 for Belleville District the workers connected with the K. of C. Army Hut Fund are redoubling their efforts to reach that mark. Canvasses are being made night and day, and at headquarters corner of Bridge and Front street, the secretary is on the job all the time. Last night the total had reached $3,200. This is most encouraging. …

To-day and to-morrow canvassers in Trenton will cover the British Chemical Co., where it is expected that a large sum will be realized. This is the first time a direct canvass of these works has been made for any fund, and the committee of the Knights of Columbus Army Hut Fund appreciates the very great favor that is being shown them by the management. The management in turn realizes the very great work that is being done by this Army Hut Fund.

The works of the Canada Cement Plant at Point Anne will also be canvassed this afternoon, through the kindness of the management. If everyone will get together for one more day, Belleville will surpass the $5,000 objective.”

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. Frank Sweet Killed in Action. Uncle of Pte. Howard Black Who Recently Died of Wounds. Mrs. Richard Black, 24 Hillside street, has received the following notice: (413035) Pte. Frank Sweet. Dear madam:—I regret to have to advise you that notice has been received here that the above mentioned soldier has been reported to have been killed in action on the 8th of August, 1918. Yours truly, E. Baker. For Director of S.A. & A.P.

Frank Sweet enlisted with the 39th Battalion in this city, and went overseas with that battalion. In England he was transferred to another unit, and went to France, where he served his country faithfully for over a year as a sharp shooter, and later as military police. He was invalided to England with trench rheumatism and he remained there until April, 1918, when he again went to France and on August the 8th made his supreme sacrifice for King and country. He was the fifth and youngest son of the late Wm. Sweet of Bancroft, and brother of Mrs. R. Black of this city.

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 5)

Howard Black“Pte. Howard Black. This family has been doubly bereaved as this is the second loss within a few days. Frank Sweet was an uncle of Pte. Howard Black, whose death from gun shot wounds was previously announced. Howard was a bright and promising student. He received his education at Queen Mary School and was a pupil of the High School when he enlisted at the age of 16 in the bugle band of the 155th Battalion. He was with this battalion while it was in camp at Barriefield, but did not go overseas with it as he was too young.

On being transferred to the Special Corps he was sent to Lindsay as bugler to the Arsenal Guard and volunteered to go with the 252nd Battalion in May of 1917 which battalion went overseas at the same time as the 254th from this city.

In England he attended the Signalling School at Seaford, graduating fourth in a class of fifty. In March of this year he went to France where he very cheerfully and faithfully performed all duties, and September 5th gave up his brave young life for the liberty and peace of all nations. In religion he was a Presbyterian, being identified with John Street Presbyterian church.”

[Note: Private William John Howard Black died on September 5, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 369 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 5)

“European Scourge Enters Ontario. Toronto. Spanish influenza which raged throughout large sections of Europe and made serious inroads upon the German armies in France, has made its appearance in Ontario. So far most of the cases reported in the province are in the camp of the Polish Legion at Niagara, and the authorities there have had to place part of the camp in quarantine and confine all the Polish soldiers to barracks.

The disease has already become epidemic in certain parts of the United States, particularly in one or two cantonments, and in order to prevent it getting established here Hon. W. D. McPherson, Provincial Secretary, and Col. J. W. S. McCullough, Provincial Officer of Health, had an extended conference. As a result steps will be taken to warn the public and to circularize all the physicians in the province regarding the matter. …

The disease resembles influenza, the most important symptoms being sudden onset with chills, severe headache with pain in the back and limbs, and a general feeling of malaise. The face is flushed and herpes appears on the lips in some cases. The fever runs from 99 to 102 and occasionally to 103 or 104. The highest point is reached on the second day when there is a sudden drop, and by the fourth day the patient is well. Many cases develop a harsh cough with thick sputum and some develop into pneumonia.

Dr. McCullough stated that the disease is spread by germs carried in the nose and throat and the infection is generally passed from one person to another by direct personal contact, drinking utensils, the use of common towels, etc.

The Provincial Officer urges people to avoid contact with persons with the disease or showing symptoms and those infected are advised to remain in bed and have a physician called.”

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Recommended for Medal. Mrs. A. E. Baldwin, 22 Green St. has received a letter from Nursing Sister L. E. Walker, of the Third Western General Hospital, at Neath, S. Wales, of which the following is a part: ‘I am writing a few lines to you for your husband, who is in this hospital, and who at present is not able to write himself. He was admitted here on August 21st. He had been gassed and was suffering from some burns.

He is now going on well, but his eyes are still very troublesome and he cannot stand the light, and has to have them bandaged up; but you must not worry, he is getting on quite all right, though of course it will take time to get over the effect of the wretched gas the Germans use. The burns take some time to heal, but he is progressing well and steadily, and before long will be writing to you himself.

He would like you to know he got recommended for the Military Medal on the 9th of this month when he went over the top. He sends love to the children and yourself. I must tell you he is a very good patient.’ ”

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 7)

“S. A. Campaign. The Salvation Army local workers have received much encouragement in their appeal to the public this week, many of the small envelopes being returned without a call being made. There is every indication that the objective will be reached and the good work of the S. A. continued. …

It looks as if Belleville is to lead the list of cities and towns of Ontario in the annual Harvest Thanksgiving financial effort of the Salvation Army. The men in khaki, 32 in number, who were active members or adherents of the local branch, will have the satisfaction that those at home who ‘stay by the stuff’ are also doing their bit. The Salvation Army makes a specialty of helping the wives and children of these men who are away.”

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Soldiers Arrive Today. Two hundred members of the Depot Battalion at Barriefield Camp under Lt.-Col. Smart leave Kingston today for Belleville, and will be quartered in the Armouries until the new barracks at Barriefield are completed. It is thought that the barracks will be finished in eight weeks, and then will be ready for occupation. Four hundred men will shortly be at work at the new buildings at Barriefield and already bunk-houses to accommodate that number have been erected.”

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Killed in Action. On Monday Mrs. G. Thibault residing at 18 Murney street, city, received a telegram stating that her husband, Pte. George Thibault, was reported missing on August 28th. To-day she received a message stating that he was killed in action on the above date. In 1915 he enlisted and went overseas with the 59th Battalion of Peterboro.”

[Note: Private Georges Thibault died on August 28, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 511 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Five Times Wounded. Mr. George Casselman of this city, is in receipt of the following official telegram, which refers to her son: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you Pte. Wm. Neilson Casselman, infantry, reported admitted to Nov. 4 General Hospital, Dannies-Camiers, Sept. 4th, gunshot wound in right shoulder.’

Pte. Casselman enlisted and left Belleville with the 39th Battalion three years ago. Since being on active service he has been wounded five times.”

 

By | September 20th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Alex Conley Dies of Wounds, St. Julien Chapter I.O.D.E. Offers Thanks for Tag Day, Edward Givens Stapley Visited by Red Cross, Coal Situation, Army Huts’ Fund Half Subscribed

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 2)

“Death of Pte. Alex. Conley. Mrs. Hiram Ibey received a sad message this week that her brother, Pte. Alex. Conley had died of wounds at No. 7 Casualty Clearing Station, France, September 2nd, gun shot wound, right leg fractured. Pte. Conley went overseas from Belleville with the 80th Battalion, then transferred to 50th Battalion, and now numbered with the gallant soldiers who gave their lives for liberty and freedom. This is the fourth time he had been wounded. Another brother gave his life about six months ago. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved ones.”

[Note: Private Alex Conley died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 387 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 2)

“Card of Thanks. The officers and members of St. Julien Chapter, I.O.D.E. wish to thank all those who so kindly assisted and made the Tag Day on Sept. 14 so successful. The sum of $561 was realized and will be devoted to the Christmas parcels for our boys overseas.”

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 2)

“Red Cross Care Of Wounded Soldiers. Mrs. Richard Stapley of this city, is in receipt of the following letter referring to her son, Pte. Ted Stapley, who was recently wounded: Information Bureau, Canadian Red Cross Society, 12 Berners Street, London, W.I., August 28th, 1918.

Dear Madam:—I beg to inform you that Pte. E. G. Stapley 2584305, 38th Canadians, is in the Chester Military Hospital, Chester, England. He is suffering from a gun shot wound in the abdomen, and only arrived from France on the 25th. Our Red Cross visitor has called and seen him, but was not able to find out much as he had only just arrived. He will be visited regularly, and should he be in need of any comforts other than those supplied by the hospital, we will gladly send them to him from our parcel office. We shall be able to give you more details next week. Yours truly, D. Forester.”

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Coal Situation. Yesterday afternoon a meeting of the Fuel Committee in connection with the City Council was held at which Mr. T. F. Wills, Fuel Controller, was present, after a trip to New York and Boston. It was decided to procure on behalf of the city a quantity of coal for delivery in the near future. Mr. Wills informed a representative of The Intelligencer that he is in a position to secure a considerable quantity of coal for delivery in the city within a reasonable time. This may be taken advantage of by the City Council.”

The Intelligencer September 19, 1918 (page 7)

“K. of C. Hut Fund Half Subscribed. One of the most noticeable features of the present Campaign for the K. of C. Army Hut Fund is the number of voluntary subscribers, who have walked into the Campaign Headquarters, corner of Bridge and Front Streets, with generous donations for this most worthy cause. …

The canvassers, are making every endeavor to call at every house in Belleville, but it is not always possible to find the householder at home, or it may not be convenient for them at the time to meet the canvassers. For this reason the committee is making a great sacrifice to keep the headquarters open all the time. …  It is not believed that any person in Belleville would deliberately avoid giving, which is an absolute duty, to this fund. …

Up until noon today the returns from Belleville District show very nearly half of the objective has been reached. The subscriptions heard from amount in the neighborhood of $2,250. …  In Belleville every class of citizen has been represented in the general subscriptions, that have been recorded.”

By | September 19th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Harry Rath of Tweed Doing Well, Patriotic Speech Given at Griffin’s Theatre, Preparation for Soldiers in Belleville, Sailors’ Fund Near $2,000 Mark, Leroy Buck Killed in Action, Ezra H. Sarles Dies of Wounds, Army Huts Campaign

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Enjoys the Game. Flight Lieut. Harry Rath of Tweed, is having some real exciting experience in Hun chasing at the front and characteristic of his manner when in training in this country he evidently enjoys the game. On August 9th he was chasing a Hun machine when of a sudden two other Hun planes made for him and naturally there were some doings. He succeeded in bringing down one of the three and then did some strategical movements far back of the line which he reached in safety but not without his plane being perforated with many bullets. On August 14th he got another Hun and on the 17th still another which goes to show that ‘Harry’ is doing his share in maintaining the good name of Canada in this conflict. He reports feeling fine and speaks highly of the treatment of the troops.”

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Play Up! Pay Up! During the intermission between the first and second acts of ‘The Garden of Allah’ last evening at Griffin’s Theatre, Mr. F. E. O’Flynn gave a brief talk along patriotic lines, drawing attention to the necessity for keeping war effort up to the high water mark and permitting no slackening of interest in the welfare of our soldier boys overseas.

Mr. O’Flynn asked for a generous response to the request for funds for the Knights of Columbus soldiers’ comfort huts in the war zone and also pointed out various departments of war effort which should always be kept in mind, including the Red Cross penny bags, and Christmas parcels for soldiers. Incidentally he paid a deserved tribute to the Canadian post office service stating that since the war began he had been sending parcels weekly to soldiers in the war zone and every parcel had reached its destination in good time and in good condition.

The present call is for support for those rest and refreshment huts so appreciated by the soldiers, and the public can not be too generous in this regard. Mr. O’Flynn read a letter recently received by him from a Belleville soldier on the firing line which well illustrated the magnificent spirit of Canada’s fighting men, so worthy of the pride of the folks at home. He also read a poem aptly describing the warm welcome of a parcel of comforts and eats from home in the trenches and the sudden and great popularity of the recipient.”

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Preparing for the Soldiers. Ten members of the Royal Canadian Engineers stationed at Brockville, arrived in this city last evening in command of Capt. Palmer. To-day they are busily engaged in preparing the Armouries for the soldiers who will arrive here from Kingston the latter part of the week. The old school buildings on Catherine and Pinnacle streets will also be put in condition to be used for military stores.”

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Near the $2,000 Mark. Belleville’s contribution to the fund to protect the widows and orphans of Canada’s sailors from want now bids fair to cross the desired two-thousand dollar mark (minus a civic grant). Another substantial donation has been received in a check for fifty dollars from Mr. H. W. Ackerman; bringing that gentleman’s total contribution to the Sailors Fund to one hundred dollars.

Subscribers who have not sent in their contributions as yet should hand them in at once to Mr. Alexander Ray the local representative of the Ontario Navy League, as it is desirable that the fund be closed as soon as possible.”

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 7)

Leroy Buck

“Sleeps in Flanders Field. Within the past few days a number of homes in this city have been saddened by messages from the Director of Records at Ottawa, conveying the intelligence that loved ones had made the supreme sacrifice, somewhere in France. Yesterday afternoon Mrs. Annie Buck, residing at 18 Everett street, was in receipt of one of these sad messages, notifying her that her son, Private Leroy Buck, was killed in action on September 3rd.

Roy, as he was familiarly called, was a young man, scarcely 20 years of age. Some time before he enlisted with the 155th Battalion in this city, he endeavored to join a unit for overseas service, but was rejected owing to his youth. He became a member of the bugle band of the 155th Battalion, and went overseas with the battalion. He had been in France for some time and had been mentioned for bravery displayed. Pte. Buck was a young man of fine character and manly ways, and beloved by all who knew him. His demise will be sincerely regretted by many friends. He attended Queen Mary’s School and was identified with the Baptist church. An elder brother, Pte. Howard Buck, is in France.”

[Note: Private Leroy Maitland Buck died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 376 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 7)

“E. H. Searles Killed. Mr. and Mrs. M. Searles of Frankford, have received word that their eldest son, Ezra H., died of wounds in the shoulder on Sept. 2nd. He enlisted at St. Catharines with the 176th Battalion (Niagara Rangers). Besides his parents he leaves two brothers, Roy, formerly Principal of Bancroft Public School, who was wounded on August 31st, and Frank, who recently went overseas with the Canadian Engineers.”

[Note: Private Ezra Halden Sarles died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 496 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 18, 1918 (page 8)

“K. Of C. Subscriptions Still Coming in Strong. The Campaign Committee for the K. of C. Army Hut Fund was able to report last night that over $2,000 having already been subscribed from the district for this most worthy cause. The actual canvass of the city began yesterday afternoon, and will continue to-day, tomorrow and Friday. $3,000 is still needed to attain the objective set. No doubt this objective will be reached, and it is hoped that it will be far surpassed. …

The K. of C. Army Hut is going to supply some small degree of comfort for those boys out there that they would never know if it were not for these voluntary funds at home, and the women, who are doing this work and who occupy the home trenches. …  Therefore let the citizens of Belleville get together for the balance of this week, and by talk, by action and even by thought boost for the success of the K. of C. Army Hut Fund and put Belleville where it belongs, in the front rank of the generous towns and cities of Canada.”

By | September 18th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Army Huts Campaign, City Council to Secure Canning Factory for Soldiers, Poster for Army Huts by John Lewis Co., Parents Give Money to Y.M.C.A., Poster for Saving Money, William Hunter Killed in Action, William John Howard Black Dies of Wounds, William Woods Killed in Action, Henry Edgar Carter Killed in Action, Poster for Army Huts Campaign

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 2)

“K. of C. Drive in Full Swing Success Assured. The first day of the K. of C. Army Hut Fund Campaign saw the drive off to a good start. All classes of citizens are showing their interest and people in all walks of life have been calling regularly at the Campaign headquarters, corner of Bridge and Front Sts., with generous subscriptions, and it is expected that the $5,000 objective will be reached before the end of the week. …

The local committee are working day and night to make this fund a success, and the same thing is going on from one end of Canada to the other. In the Belleville district reports are pouring in from Trenton, Tweed, Deseronto, Stirling, centres where the same interest is being shown.

The canvass of the city will be made tomorrow, Thursday and Friday, and it is hoped that every household will be waiting for the canvassers with a generous contribution. …  A list will be made of the contributors and published. Statements will be made showing where every dollar was expended. In the Army Huts everyone is welcome and everything is free. Therefore at home everyone should give to the utmost.”

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 3)

“Soldiers Coming From Kingston. A special meeting of the City Council was called for last evening the object of which was to secure for military purposes the canning factory building situated in this city. …  Mayor Platt stated that the military authorities were anxious to secure the canning factory building here for the segregation of some 300 to 500 soldiers during the winter months. The object was that soldiers coming here would be placed in the building, thoroughly examined medically, detained there a number of days and then when found free from all trace of disease, passed on to the Armouries and thence overseas. This is apart from those who are coming later to take possession of the Armouries. …

Ald. Robinson moved, seconded by Ald. Treverton, that a special committee composed of the Mayor, Aldermen Robinson and Hanna be appointed with power to act to secure on as reasonable terms as possible the canning factory building for the use of the militia during the fall and winter months. The motion was unanimously adopted and the Council adjourned.”

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 3)

Poster for Army Huts campaign

“Give! Give! Give! To The K. of C. Army Huts Campaign.

The John Lewis Co. Ltd. Heating, Plumbing, Tinsmithing. Phone 132. 265 Front Street.”

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 4)

“Remembered His Pals. Somewhere in France a Hastings County soldier boy was doing his bit for God and Home and Native Land. His parents who reside near Belleville a few days ago purchased a money order for twenty dollars and some five franc notes to send to their boy over there; but a few hours later the dread news came that his name had been added to the Honor Roll of the immortals who have given their lives that freedom and righteousness shall not perish from the earth.

The twenty dollar money order and the five-franc notes had not been mailed when the message came that their boy had laid down his rifle and taken up his crown in the Better Land where the currency is character and golden deeds. The parents in the midst of their grief thought of the other boys over there and handed the money order and five-franc notes to Mr. D. V. Sinclair to be given to the Y.M.C.A. overseas fund. They considered that the money belonged to their boy and knew from his letters that no better disposition of it could be made than to provide comforts for his pals still on the firing line.

Thus through the mist of bitter tears and the shadow of sacrifice shines that great and kindly light of human sympathy—the thought for others—which makes the rugged road of life worth while travelling after all.”

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 5)

Poster for saving money

“Pile up the Surplus. To win this war every ounce of the strength of each of the allied nations must be put forth to meet the organized, trained and disciplined efficiency of the Central Powers—that gigantic, ruthless force which is the result of fifty years of planning and preparation.

Every cent you spend represents that much effort, because somebody must do something for you in order to earn that cent—somebody’s effort must be given to you instead of to the war.

The war can be won only by the surplus strength of the allied nations. The money each individual saves represents that surplus strength. So the truly loyal Canadian will use less, spend less, and save more, to help to win the war.

Published under the Authority of The Minister of Finance of Canada.”

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Wm. Hunter Killed. Mrs. James Hunter, residing at 180 James street, city, is in receipt of the following sad message, which refers to her son: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 805182 Pte. William Hunter was killed in action on September 1st, 1918. Private Hunter enlisted with the 136th Battalion at Bowmanville, three years ago. He was a son of Capt. James Hunter of Belleville, and was a young man who was beloved by all who knew him. Previous to going overseas he was employed on a Government dredge.”

[Note: Private William Hunter died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 433 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Wounds Proved Fatal. On Friday, the 5th inst., Mr. Richard Black, residing at 24 Hillside St., city, received a message from the Director of Methods at Ottawa that his son, Pte. William John Howard Black, was dangerously wounded on September 1st. Monday Mr. Black received the sad message that his son had died of wounds.

When the 155th Battalion was recruited in this city and vicinity Pte. Black endeavored to enlist but was unable to do so as he was but 16 years of age. Later he joined a special military unit at Lindsay being for some time a bugler of the guards at the arsenal. Later he enlisted and went overseas with the 252nd Battalion.

The day the news was received here that he was wounded was the 19th anniversary of his birth. The young man had a host of friends in this city, who will regret to learn of his demise and to the bereaved family will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of all citizens.”

[Note: Private John William Howard Black died on September 5, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 369 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Sorely Afflicted. Mrs. Wm. Woods, residing on Water street, city, is in receipt of a telegram which conveyed the sad intelligence that her husband, Pte. Wm. Woods, was killed in action on September 2nd. Pte. Woods was born in England and had been a resident of Belleville for a few years.

Previous to enlistment with the 235th Battalion in this city he was a trusted employee of the Grand Trunk Railway. He was a member of Christ Church. Mrs. Woods only a short time ago received word of the death of a brother in action. She has still six brothers in active service in the army and navy. In addition to the widow Pte. Woods leaves four children of tender years. The heartfelt sympathy of all citizens will be extended to Mrs. Woods in this her hour of sore affliction.”

[Note: Private William Woods died on September 2, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 526 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Carter Killed. Mrs. F. A. Carter, residing on Roswell street, city, received the following message, which refers to her husband: ‘Deeply regret to inform you Pte. Henry Edgar Carter, infantry, officially reported killed in action on August 30th.’ Private Carter had been overseas for some time. He leaves in addition to his wife, two children, also his parents and two brothers. One of the latter is on active service in India..”

[Note: Private Henry Edgar Carter died on August 30, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 381 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 17, 1918 (page 8)

Poster for army huts campaign

“Everything Free! Everyone Welcome! In Army Huts. Help The Boys By Giving To The K. Of C. Fund.”

By | September 17th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Son of E. Guss Porter M.P. for West Hastings Killed in Action, Drive for Army Huts Begins, Comments on Gasless Sunday, Poster for Army Huts by Haines Shoe Houses, Memorial Service for Malcolm French, First Gasless Sunday, George Thibault Missing, William John Wallace Wounded, Sailors’ Fund Growing, Alan Seed Fleming Dies in Motor Accident, Siberian Contingent, Daniel James Sweeney Wounded, In Memoriam for James Henry Meloy

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 1)

Roger Porter

“Lieut. Roger Morrow Porter of Belleville, who was instantly killed while commanding his section in France, August 30, 1918. He was the son of E. Guss Porter, K.C., member of the Dominion Parliament for West Hastings, and Mrs. Porter.”

[Note: Lieutenant Roger Morrow Porter died on August 30, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 486 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 2)

“The Big Drive Has Started. While the actual canvass of the City does not begin until Wednesday, headquarters of the Campaign at the corner of Bridge and Front Sts., opened this morning and citizens started in immediately with their subscriptions. From the interest being shown no doubt is entertained that long before the week is out the $5,000 objective will be reached and passed. The citizens are not only anxious to help with their money, but also with their work. There is a spirit of comradeship being displayed that is worthy of the cause for which all are working.

Army Huts are now established in Bramshott, Whitley, Shorncliffe, Purfleet and Seaforth in England, where the men in training camps can always find recreation. …  In France the Army Huts are established in Le Treport, Etables, and the Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. Army Huts are located with the Canadian Railway troops. In the Canadian Corps Area the Huts are distributed among the Canadian divisions with headquarters in a ruined French town, as near as possible to the front with recreation room and canteen. …

In the Army Huts of the army of our great Allies, the United States, Canadian soldiers always find a warm welcome and last year the K. of C. raised $28,000,000 to establish and maintain this movement. …  The Canadian K. of C. have undertaken to reciprocate in the Canadian forces through the Canadian Army Huts. Therefore Canada is to raise $500,000 this week. Belleville’s share of the $500,000 is $5,000 and as Canada’s fighting men have led the world on the battlefield of France, so Canadians at home should not be found wanting, and the Army Huts should be over-subscribed. The headquarters at the corner of Bridge and Front Streets is open at all times. It is hoped that each citizen of Belleville will step in there and make a voluntary subscription.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 3)

“Observations on a Gasless Sunday. To the Editor of The Intelligencer. Dear Sir:—While out walking yesterday I observed a man trying to buy gasoline at a local garage. He was refused. I also noticed the street bus going to the station drawn by horses, and while on Front street I counted many cars well filled with joyriders and noticed one garage selling gasoline.

It is this class of people who are responsible for strict laws in Canada, when they will not adhere to the request of our Government. To them I would like to say that their actions indicate that they think it more necessary that they should have a good time on Sunday than that there shall be plenty of gasoline for military operations.

Get the picture in your minds of a Canadian boy who has been at the front for several years. He has been in the trenches, he has been ‘over the top,’ he has been wounded, wet, tired and sick, and still he stays with it—and yet when the request is made to cut out Sunday driving for pleasure you won’t do it. You’re some patriot, aren’t you. ‘OBSERVER.’ ”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

Poster for army huts campaign

“A cup of coffee in the trenches is worth a dollar. Your dollar given to the K of C Army Huts Campaign Sept. 15 to 23 will buy a hundred cups, for which there is no charge to the fighting men. Realise your duty & GIVE GIVE GIVE.

The Haines Shoe Houses. Belleville, Napanee, Smith’s Falls.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

“Memorial Service. A memorial service was held in the Tabernacle Sunday School yesterday for the late Malcolm French, who recently fell in action. The service throughout was very impressive, and one long to be remembered by all present. The remarks by his Sunday School teacher, Mr. Height, the superintendent, Mr. Walmsley, and Rev. Mr. Moore, Rev. Mr. Baker and Mr. Bell, all pointed to the excellent character of the late soldier. Even the hymns selected and the music by the orchestra, had a very touching and impressive effect. The orchestra opened the service with ‘O Canada,’ and concluded with the Dead March in Saul, after which Mr. Wannacott sounded the ‘Last Post.’ ”

[Note: Private Malcolm Linford French died on August 30, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 411 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

“First Gasless Sunday. The request of the Dominion Fuel Controller that pleasure riding in motor cars be discontinued for several Sundays in order to conserve the gasoline supply for war purposes resulted in a marked absence from the streets of the city and country roads of automobile parties on pleasure bent. The threatening aspect of the weather in the afternoon helped, no doubt, in the saving of gasoline, but there was a general disposition on the part of automobile owners to comply with the request of the Fuel Controller.

Of course, there were some automobile parties to be seen, plainly out for pleasure, but it was noticeable that members of these parties were as a rule, either uninformed as to the need of gasoline saving or too thoughtless to comply with the request.

Garages were generally closed for the day and it was almost impossible to secure any gasoline. Several cars were noticed bearing the sign: ‘This car out on business.’

Taken altogether the first gasless Sunday was a distinct success in this vicinity giving promise of more general observance on succeeding Sundays.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. Thibault Missing. Mrs. G. Thibault, residing at 18 Murney Street, city, is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records, which refers to her husband: Sincerely regret to inform you 455484 Pte. George Thibault, infantry, officially reported missing, August 28. Pte. Thibault enlisted in 1915 with the 59th Battalion at Peterboro.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

“Wm. J. Wallace Wounded. Mr. W. J. Wallace, of Wharf street, city, received the following telegram, relative to her husband: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 412331 Pte. Wm. John Wallace, infantry, officially reported admitted to 26 General Hospital, Etaples, August 29th, Gunshot wound hip. Pte. Wallace was formerly of Montreal. He enlisted with the 39th Battalion of this city.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

“Sailor Fund Growing. The local Sailors’ Fund is slowly growing toward the $2000 mark and needs some patriotic citizen to give it one more good boost toward the mark, which will prevent Belleville’s contribution being altogether unworthy of the patriotism and wealth of the citizens.

This morning a contribution was received from Mr. J. W. Johnson, who has been very ill, for some months, but has never lost touch with local and world events. Mr. Alex Ray, the local representative of the Ontario Navy League, is keeping the list open as long as possible in the hope that it will go ‘over the top’ for $2,000 at least. Has everybody paid an installment on their debt to the sailors? Don’t be a slacker—give something if only ten cents.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 5)

“Lieut. Fleming Killed. The sad news came to Capt. and Mrs. John Fleming, 263 Foster avenue, that their son, Lieut. Allen Fleming, had been killed in a motor accident at Egham England. Lieut. Fleming won his commission through having rendered especially valuable services to the Empire, having gone overseas as a private in 1916. He was mentioned in despatches for meritorious service and served in various capacities, being secretary to Gen. MacDougal, for a time. Recently he was on staff duty in connection with the forestry operations and was highly regarded for his efficient methods.

Many friends in Belleville and elsewhere will regret to hear of his death and great sympathy is felt with the sorrowing relatives. Lieut. Fleming was married in England, and an infant child is left.”

[Note: Lieutenant Alan Seed Fleming died on September 10, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 408 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 6)

“Siberian Contingent. A last chance for voluntary enlistment. Recruits wanted for service in Siberia in all branches of the army. Any man, whether under the M. S. A. or not may volunteer. For further particulars see Lieut. A. C. Lord, recruiting officer, at the G. W. V. A. rooms, Corby Buildings, on Monday and Tuesday, September 16th and 17th.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 6)

“Pte. Sweeney Wounded. Mrs. Robt. Tarlington, residing at 50 Murney street, city, is in receipt of a message from the Director of Records at Ottawa with the information that Pte. Daniel James Sweeney, machine gun unit, was officially reported admitted to Cambridge Ship hospital, Aldershot, on Sept. 5th, with gunshot wound in the chest and arm. Pte. Sweeney is a brother of Mrs. Tarlington, and lived in Belleville some time. He enlisted at Cobourg and left with the first draft of the 59th Battalion.”

The Intelligencer September 16, 1918 (page 6)

“In Memoriam. In loving memory of James Henry Meloy, who was killed in action on the 16th of Sept. 1916:

Servant of God, well done, / Thy glorious warfares past, / The battles fought, the victory won / And thou art crowned at last. / Soldier of Christ, well done, / Praise by thy new employ, / And while eternal ages run / Rest in thy Saviour’s joy.

From his Wife and Children.”

 

 

 

By | September 16th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Lloyd Moore Killed in Action, Edward Yorke Wounded, Stanley Harris Third Time Wounded, Poster for Saving Money, Ad for O’Keefe Beer

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 7)

“Made Supreme Sacrifice. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Moore of Bancroft, received the sad intelligence on Monday that their son, Lloyd, had been killed in action on August 28th. He went overseas with the 254th Battalion from Belleville, and had been in the trenches about a year. He was only twenty years of age.”

[Note: Private Lloyd Moore died on August 28, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 473 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Edward Yorke Wounded. Mr. K. W. Yorke residing at 249 William street, city, is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you Pte. George Edward Yorke, infantry, officially admitted to Fort Pitt Military Hospital, Chatham, September 4th, gunshot wound left arm.’

Pte. Yorke enlisted and went overseas with the 48th Highlanders of Toronto, where he was living when the war broke out. For some years he was a resident of Belleville, where he was well known. Of five sons of Mr. Yorke three have been wounded in active service overseas.”

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 7)

“Third Time Wounded. Mrs. A. J. Jordan, residing at 73 Moira Street East, city, is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records, which refers to her brother: Sincerely regret to inform you Corporal Stanley Harris, infantry, officially reported admitted to 18 General Hospital, Dannes, Camiers, Sept. 4th, gunshot wound in left shoulder.’

Corporal Harris enlisted and went overseas with the 155th Battalion from this city. This is the third time he has been wounded, having previously received wounds on the right hip and face. He was also laid up in France for three months with an attack of pneumonia. His many friends in Belleville will hope for his speedy recovery.”

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 9)

Poster for saving money

“To every home there comes a time when every thought, every hope, every prayer for the future centres on the recovery of one loved one. In that hour of anguish, every means to recovery is sought—the highest medical skill, trained nurses, costly treatment. Does the price matter?

It may mean doing without things they think they need. It may mean privations, sacrifices, hardships. They make unbelievable savings, they achieve the impossible, but they get the money to pay.

To-day in this critical period of our nationhood, there is imperative need for MONEY—vast sums of money. Only one way now remains to obtain it. The nation must save, every community, every family, every individual Canadian must save.

Start TO-DAY. Save your money so that you may be in a position to lend it to your country in its time of need.

Published under the Authority of The Minister of Finance of Canada.”

The Intelligencer September 14, 1918 (page 11)

Ad for O'Keefe beer

“Changed in Strength Only. Though the Government’s regulations have compelled us to make lighter beers, the quality, taste and purity of O’Keefe’s brews remain unchanged. The same model brewery produces them—the same sanitary conditions are observed—and the same cleanliness in manufacture insisted on.

O’Keefe’s Imperial Beers. Lager. Ale. Stout.

Mild, light and pleasant, they are ideal as summer beverages.

O’Keefe’s ‘O.K.’ Brand and York Springs Ginger Ales on sale at all hotels, restaurants, and refreshment stands.

The O’Keefe Brewery Co. Limited.”

By | September 14th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments