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100 Years Ago: Epidemic Past Crest, Victory Loan Campaign Begins, Called by Death: William Edward Taylor, Ernest Edward Reddick, Mary Theresa Knott, Robert Stapley, William Henry Knott, Alexander Binney, Clifford Kent, Martha Ann Smith, James Bennie, Joseph McCormick, Margaret May Smith, William Brock Shorey, Alice Lillian Hess, Armstrong Andrews, Poster for Victory Bonds, Purchase Goods from Home, Standard Time, Flu Hits Coal Supply, Seed Grain Distribution, Ad for John Henley’s Shoe Repair

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 1)

“Epidemic Has Passed Crest Improvement Now Expected. Yesterday was a busy day for the emergency organization working under the direction of the local Board of Health. There were many homes where help was badly needed on account of the illness of members of the family and the workers were more numerous yesterday.

A large quantity of broth was made by the workers of the Domestic Science department in the High School supplemented by broth and nourishing delicacies supplied from various homes. A number of volunteer autos rendered useful service all day from the Y.M.C.A. headquarters and the High School.

The call for a cook stove in Saturday’s Intelligencer as the result of a family being found all sick with influenza and no stove, fire and fuel in the house was speedily answered by a donation of fifty dollars from a well-known citizen and a stove and coal were soon furnished.

The City Board of Health officials claim that the Township of Thurlow is not looking after its own sick people who live close to the city, especially in the section known as ‘Stoney Lonesome’ and several township cases have been cared for by the city emergency organization. The attention of Reeve Vermilyea was called to the cases. The city organization will withdraw their services from these township cases at once as there is more work in the city than the organization can find workers for.

Free public vaccination was resumed to-day from 11.30 to 1.30 and many availed themselves of the opportunity to be inoculated with the preventative serum. It is confidently expected that conditions will improve every day from now on as it is thought that the worst is over and the epidemic will soon pass away altogether.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 1)

“Over The Top For Big Drive. Victory Loan Campaign Begins. The following telegram was received this morning from Victory Loan Headquarters, Toronto: Toronto, Oct. 28, 1918. Mr. W. B. Deacon, Chairman Victory Loan, Belleville, Ontario.

Chairman,—The preparatory work for the great campaign is completed. Your forces are ready for the attack. On Monday at nine o’clock the drive began. Ontario’s task is to raise two hundred and fifty million dollars. Our army of fifteen thousand committee men and team canvassers together with thousands of other auxiliary helpers constitute the strongest and most complete provincial wide organization ever got together in this province. The farmers, manufacturers and all classes of our citizens have just been blest with the most prosperous year in their history. The wealth is here, our country’s need is urgent, we are only asked to lend, but to lend to the utmost. The eyes of the Empire are upon us—our gallant boys in France and Flanders are awaiting the result. The Hun is also watching.

With implicit trust in the unswerving loyalty of the people of Ontario and with unbounded confidence in your leadership and in the fighting spirit of the men of your committees and canvassing teams, we await the returns of the next three weeks. Ontario must not fail. The horizon is our objective—Lead on to Victory. G. M. Wood, Chairman for Ontario Victory Loan.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 2)

“Called by Death. Since Saturday the grim monster of death has laid its icy grasp upon several citizens of Belleville and vicinity and in consequence a number of homes are in mourning.

‘Pte. W. E. Taylor. Pte. William E. Taylor, a member of the First Depot Battalion in this city passed away yesterday from an attack of pneumonia following the flu. Deceased was 25 years of age and his home was at Victoria Road, Victoria County, where the body was shipped this afternoon.’

[Note: Private William Edward Taylor died on October 27, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 511 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

‘Pte. Reddick. On Sunday Pte. Ernest Edward Reddick of Trenton, a member of the First Depot Battalion, in Belleville, died on Saturday from pneumonia. Deceased was 34 years of age and unmarried. The body was to-day shipped to his late home.’

[Note: Private Ernest Edward Reddick died on October 27, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 489 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

‘Mrs. Harry Knott. Saturday Mrs. Mary Theresa Knott, wife of Mr. Harry Knott, passed away at the family residence, 32 Olive St. A sad feature of the case is that the husband is overseas. Deceased was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Patrick McHugh, who passed away some months ago. Surviving, besides the husband, are one young son, one brother, John B. McHugh, overseas, and four sisters Stella and Madeline at home and Catherine and Mabel of Battleford, Saskatchewan. She was a member of St. Michael’s Church.’

‘Robert Stapley. On Sunday, Mr. Robert Stapley passed away, at his late residence, Thurlow, after being ill about three weeks. An attack of pneumonia was the cause of death. Deceased was a son of Mr. Wm. Stapley and was in his 34th year. He was employed in the car department of the G. T. R. here and a faithful workman. Mr. Stapley was a member of the Railway Mens’ Union and the Royal True Blues Society. In religion he was a Methodist. A widow and five children, Winnifred, Cora, Harry, Wilfrid and Oscar survive.’

‘Wm. H. Knott. Mr. Wm. H. Knott who resided at 74 George Street, south, died on Sunday, after a week’s illness. Deceased, who was 40 years of age was born at West Bromwick, England, and came to Belleville about 7 years ago. He was a fireman at the city Gas Plant. Mr. Knott was a member of St. Thomas Church and was much esteemed by all who knew him. A widow and four children, William, Andrew, Florence and Alice survive. Also three brothers and four sisters. The brothers are Joseph and Andrew of this city and Harry, with the C.E.F. overseas. The sisters are Mrs. Samuel Henn, Mrs. Frederick Goyer, Mrs. Frank Shoener and Miss Nellie of this city.’

‘Alexander Binney. At an early hour this morning Mr. Alexander Binney died at the residence of his father-in-law, Mr. Andrew Gray, College Hill. Deceased was 29 years of age and was born in Dundee, Scotland. A widow and one child survives, also one brother who is a prisoner of war in Germany.’

‘Clifford Kent. On Tuesday last, William Kent, aged 14 years, son of Mr. William Kent, 2nd concession of Thurlow, died and to-day, Clifford Frederick, infant son of Mr. Kent died. Both were victims of pneumonia, following the flu.’

‘Martha A. Smith. Mrs. Martha Ann Smith passed away to-day at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Ryan Kellar of Canifton. Deceased was 64 years of age and was born in Thurlow Township. Mrs. Smith’s late home was at 257 Albert street city.’

‘James Bennie. James Bennie, aged 12 years, whose home is at Windsor, Ontario, died this morning from an attack of pneumonia. The parents of the lad were in the city when his death occurred. The body will be shipped to Windsor for interment.’

‘Joseph McCormick. Mr. Joseph McCormick, a life-long and well-known resident of the city passed away this morning. Deceased, who was 69 years of age, was born in Belleville being a son of the late Mr. Arthur McCormick. For many years he conducted successfully a grocery business, but of late years lived a retired life. Mr. McCormick was a bachelor. He was a member of St. Michael’s Church. A sister, Mrs. Margaret Clarke of Toronto, survives.’

‘Mrs. Harry J. Smith. Saturday afternoon Mrs. Harry Smith passed away at the family residence, 66 Church Street, city. Deceased was a lady, who was well known and had many friends. Her maiden name was Miss Margaret G. Smith, and was a daughter of the late Mr. Alexander Smith. She was born in this city 33 years ago and had resided here all her life. Mrs. Smith was a member of St. Thomas Church. Her illness was of a brief duration. In addition to the bereaved husband six children survive. To the afflicted will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of many friends.’

‘William Brock Shorey. Shortly after the midnight hour last night, Mr. William Brock Shorey, of this city, succumbed to an attack of pneumonia, following the influenza. Deceased was comparatively a young man, being but 28 years of age. He was born in the Township of Thurlow being a son of Mr. Norris D. Shorey. The greater portion of his life was spent in this city where he had many friends, who will regret to learn of his demise. Mr. Shorey was a member of St. Thomas’ Church and a member of The Belleville Lodge A. F. & A. M. While in the city he was engaged at several occupations. A widow, but no family survive. In addition to the father, one brother, Clinton, of this city are living. Deceased’s mother died about five weeks ago. Mrs. Shorey has within the past two days been doubly bereaved as on Saturday her sister, Mrs. Harry Smith, passed away. The heartfelt sympathy of many friends will be extended to her.’

‘Mrs. Hess. The body of Mrs. Alice Lillian Hess who died at Oshawa on Saturday was brought to this city and interred in Belleville cemetery. Deceased, who was 26 years of age was a daughter of Mr. J. J. Johnson, a G. T. R. engineer, residing at 217 Charles St., city. Mrs. Hess is survived by her husband and three children. She was a member of the Methodist Church. Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor of Bridge St. Church conducted the funeral services. A number of floral tributes were placed upon the casket. The bearers were Messrs. T. Blackburn, C. N. Sulman, J. W. Davidson, A. R. Walker, C. M. Reid and W. H. Towne. Deceased left in addition to her husband and family and parents four brothers D. of Prince Rupert, J. H. in France, F. B. in U. S. Service, and Arthur D. Johnson of Belleville. The sister is Mrs. G. F. Barnewall of Windsor, Ont.’

‘Armstrong Andrews. At an early hour this morning Armstrong Andrews, aged 17 years, 7 months, passed away at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Andrews, 26 Octavia Street. In his death a bright young man has been removed from the activities of life. Deceased was born in Belleville and had lived here all his life. While a pupil at school and since leaving, Armstrong by his geniality made many friends who deeply regret his demise. For some time previous to his fatal illness he was employed as a clerk at the G. T. R. station, where his capabilities were recognized. He was a member of the John Street Presbyterian Sunday School and a member of a club of young men presided over by Mr. R. J. Graham. He was also connected with the boy scouts. The heartfelt sympathy of many will be extended to those called upon to mourn the loss of a loved one.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 5)

Poster for Victory Bonds

“To-Day You Go Into Action. Buy Victory Bonds 1918.—because Canada’s soldiers still face the horrors of war..—because Canada cannot carry on unless we support our fighting men.—because you have in you the fighting blood that stops at no sacrifices.—because you must buy Victory Bonds else all sacrifices will have been in vain.—because your heart yearns for Peace.—because nothing else matters until we win the war.

Buy Victory Bonds. Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 5)

“ ‘No goods purchased abroad are cheap that take the place of our own labor and our own raw material.’

The purchase of one thousand dollars worth of goods from your own town or your own country, instead of purchasing outside, means the addition of one person to your town or your country instead of supporting him abroad.

Eat less Bread.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 7)

“ ‘Summer Time’ Passes. With the re-adjustment of the clocks Sunday morning ‘Summer time’ passed away and standard time was renewed. For one hour Sunday morning all trains were held motionless in order that the railway schedule would fit in with the change in time.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 7)

“ ‘Flu’ Hits Coal Supply. Fuel Controller Wills received the following telegram from E. L. Cousins, Provincial Fuel Administrator. ‘The anthracite coal situation is acute, especially by reason of the influenza epidemic demoralizing the labor situation both in transportation and at the mines. It is therefore imperative that your dealers at once meet the almost certain shortage in your municipality of the anthracite coal allotment for this year by immediately putting in stocks of wood and bituminous coal. You will impress dealers that they must act upon this advice immediately.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 7)

“Distribution of Seed Grain. By instructions of the Hon. Minister of Agriculture, a free distribution of superior sorts of grain will be made during the coming winter and spring to Canadian farmers. The samples for distribution will consist of spring wheat (about 5 lbs.), white oats (about 4 lbs.), barley (about 5 lbs.),  and field peas (about 5 lbs.). These will be sent out, free, by mail, from the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, by the Dominion Cerealist, who will furnish the necessary application forms. Only one sample can be sent to each applicant. As the supply of seed is limited, farmers are advised to apply very early.—J. H. Grisdale, Director, Dominion Experimental Farms.”

The Intelligencer October 28, 1918 (page 8)

“Flu and Shoes. Many cases of Flu can be traced direct to the shoes. The sole of the shoe gets worn thin and gets in the damp, giving the wearer a bad cold, the cold leaves its victim in shape for the Flu to get a good start. This being the case, we strongly urge you, at the first sign of wear in the sole of your shoe to have them resoled at John Henley’s, Foot Bridge Gangway, Phone 609. You will be delighted with the work done and will have a better chance of warding off the Flu.”

By | October 28th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: The Honor Flag, Slogan for Victory Loans, Open Schools for Influenza Victims, In Flanders’ Fields, War Work at Home, Liquor as Medicine, Victory Loan Flag, Turn Back Clock, Arnold and Dean Collins Killed in Action, Called by Death: Mary Theresa Knott, Margaret Helen Foster, Cook Stove Needed, Ad for Gillette Safety Razor, Poster for Victory Loans, Ad for Corn Syrup

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 1)

“The Honor Flag will be the chief emblem in the Victory Loan Campaign. It is presented by His Excellency the Governor-General to all cities, towns and villages that attain their objectives, and is expected to be flown by them. It is very attractive and is sure to be sought after.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 1)

“ ‘Yours For Victory Loan 1918’ is the Canadian letter writer’s slogan in the Victory Loan campaign. Every one is asked to sign his or her letters in this way. Already some are doing it, and before the campaign is far under way it is hoped the practice will be general. It is an easy and yet most effective way of driving home the appeal for the Loan, and it will reach practically every one. Business men particularly are requested to adopt the idea. As they read their incoming and outgoing letters, during the next five weeks, they will confront ‘Yours for Victory Loan 1918’ scores of times each day. Start now signing your letters in this way. Get into the swing! Every little bit is needed, if Canada is to ‘go over the top.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 2)

“To the Editor of the Intelligencer. Dear Sir,—In these times of the serious influenza epidemic, would it not be a wise thing for the School Board to offer the schools to the Board of Health, or the Citizens’ Committee, who are working in conjunction with the Board of Health to admit influenza patients to be cared for there, as the Hospital is taxed to its capacity, and a great many people, especially the poorer people, have not the facilities or the equipment in their homes to be properly cared for.

I was in a home on College Hill last night where three members of the household were on their backs with the malady, and the fourth and only other member of the household has all the symptoms of the disease, as I was told by one of the two Sisters of Charity, who are both teachers in St. Michael’s Academy, and were at that home doing the nursing work. …

If one or two of the schools were thrown open to receive patients, it would make it easier for the doctors, who are nearly rushed to death, and it would simplify the procuring of sufficient volunteers to do the nursing, and it would segregate the trouble to a large extent. …

The epidemic can and will be stamped out but the doctors and the good ladies that are volunteering their services for the cause should be given a proper fighting chance. Yours very truly, F. S. Wallbridge.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 4)

“In Flanders’ Fields. In Flanders’ fields, the poppies grow / Between the crosses, row on row, / That mark our place; and in the sky / The larks, still bravely singing fly, / Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago / We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, / Loved and were loved; and now we lie / In Flanders’ fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe, / To you, from falling hands we throw / The torch. Be yours to lift it high. / If ye break faith with us who die, / We shall not sleep, though poppies blow / In Flanders’ fields.—Buy Victory Bonds.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 4)

“War Work at Home. The suggestion made by The Intelligencer some days ago that donations of reading matter, fruit, etc., would be appreciated at military headquarters has been acted upon by a number of citizens. Lieut.-Col. Smart, officer commanding on behalf of the staff and men, desires to thank the citizens who have so kindly remembered the soldiers.

On account of the prevailing epidemic the soldiers quartered here are practically quarantined and kindly citizens can make their enforced confinement more pleasant by sending books, magazines and papers to help pass away the time not occupied by drilling. The sick soldiers in the hospital annex will also appreciate fruit and home-made ‘eats’ not included on military menus. This is an opportunity for real war work.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 4)

“Liquor as Medicine. Rightly or wrongly many people believe that the virulence of Spanish influenza is largely due to the difficulty of securing liquor for preventative and first aid purposes. In Belleville a six-ounce bottle of brandy costs sixty-five cents and the necessary prescription at least a dollar, making a few ounces of preventative quite expensive. A prescription for a quart of liquor means in addition to the cost of the liquor, the cost of the prescription and express charges from Kingston.

So many people have confidence in the efficacy of liquor as a preventative of colds and influenza that it can not be imagined that the appointment of an authorized vendor in large centres like Belleville would injure the prohibition cause to any great extent. Why should Toronto, Kingston and other places be favored by the Ontario License Board above other places? If a vendor is necessary in Kingston one is even more necessary in Belleville as the centre of a more largely populated district. From the many pointed remarks made by people who believe that liquor has a medicinal value there is evidence of strong resentment against a condition of affairs that in their opinion has resulted in a great deal of unnecessary illness and even death.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 4)
Victory Loan flag

“Canada’s Honor Flag. Much interest will centre during the Victory Loan Campaign on the Honor Flag. This emblem, which has been designed after much deliberation, will be the central symbol of the coming campaign, and will, it is expected, be even more familiar to the people of Canada than the service flag now to be seen in so many windows. The Honor Flag will be flown from the flag poles of communities which reach their quota, and the attendant ceremony is expected to do much to add zest and competition to the campaign.

The flag is of beautiful design, embracing the national colors, red, white and blue. Across the upper left hand corner there are five bars, each representing a Canadian war loan. At the lower left-hand corner is the Dominion coat of arms.

Not a village, town or city in Canada should miss the honor of an Honor Flag. Believing that every place will go ‘away over the top,’ the Dominion Publicity Committee is providing for a flag for every centre in Canada. Whatever the quota set, whatever the surplus over that amount, the flag will be presented by the Duke of Devonshire, Governor-General of Canada, and it is expected that each place will raise a flag with all the ceremony that attaches to the honor of having won it. …

There is another honor emblem. The Honor Roll will be seen in all the large stores, offices and factories providing 75 per cent of the employees become subscribers. If 85 per cent buy bonds a sticker will be attached showing that to be the case, and so on up to 100 per cent.

To those who purchase bonds an Honor Button will be given. It is about the same size as the buttons given with each purchase during the first Victory Loan a year ago and bears the inscription ‘Subscriber, 1918 Victory Loan.’ In the centre is the Honor Flag with its five bars and coat of arms.

Similar in design, but much larger, about like a silver dollar, is the button to be worn by the canvassers and the word ‘Canvasser’ is substituted for ‘Subscriber.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 5)

“Turn Back the Clock. Daylight saving is drawing to a close. On Sunday morning at 1 o’clock we are asked to turn back the clock one hour. Some are rejoicing at the prospect of making up for that hour of sleep they lost last April. An expert reminds us that turning back the clock is not good for it. The same result can be obtained by turning the hands forward eleven hours.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 5)

“Doubly Bereaved. Mr. J. N. Collins, of Winnipeg, former C.N.R. agent at Bancroft, received word on Friday last of the death of his two sons, Arnold and Dean, at the front. Both boys were killed on the same day, Sept. 29th. Arnold was a lieutenant and Dean was a sergeant in a machine gun section, and had been in France for about two and a half years.”

[Note: Lieutenant John Arnold Collins died on September 29, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 387 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Sergeant James Dean Collins died on September 29, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 387 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 6)

“Called by Death: ‘Mrs. H. Knott. Mrs. Harry Knott, aged 25 years, of this city, passed away this morning. An obituary notice will appear on Monday.’

‘Margaret Foster. Margaret Helen Foster, aged 3 years and 9 months, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Foster, residing at 303 Pinnacle street, died this morning. The father is a returned soldier.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 6)

“Who Will Give a Cook Stove? Only fifty per cent of the families needing assistance on account of sickness can be given any attention by the limited number of volunteer workers available. A cook stove and coal is needed for a family. A number of motor cars are needed at the Y. M. C. A. tomorrow morning. Food supplies tomorrow should be sent to the Science Kitchen, High School. All willing to help report at Y.M.C.A. building.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 7)

Ad for Gillette safety razor

“Daylight Saving Ends Sunday October 27th at 2 A.M. Ordinary time will be resumed throughout Canada on Sunday, October 27th. At 2 o’clock in the morning of that day, all official clocks are to be put back one hour.

It is suggested that all private clocks and watches be put back one hour on the night previous.

Please note that the Gillette Safety Razor will continue to save time by day or by night, without change.

Daylight saving in its first year has proved a great convenience and a complete success. People who were inclined to be sceptical are now convinced of its merits. Like the Gillette Safety Razor, actual experience with it has banished indifference and opposition and given place to enthusiastic appreciation. Gillette S. Razor. Conserver of Time.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 9)

Poster for Victory Loans

“Through all these dark, uncertain days, our soldiers have held aloft and brightly burning, the sacred torch of freedom. On Monday, for a space, it passes to our hands. Does it pass to hands less eager—hands less worthy? The world shall know our answer!

The Victory Loan 1918 Opens Monday.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 26, 1918 (page 10)

Ad for corn syrup

“Save Sugar. Canada is receiving only just enough sugar for her actual needs! There is no surplus for wastage. First, all waste of sugar must cease; second, wherever possible, Corn Syrup must be used as an alternative to sugar. You will discover a real economy, and a delicious addition to your household supplies if you Use Corn Syrup.

Use Crown Brand Corn Syrup as a Sauce on Puddings. Use Lily White instead of Sugar in Cakes. Use Lily White in making Marmalades, Jams and in all Stewed Fruits.

Canada Starch Co., Limited.”

 

By | October 26th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Poster for Victory Bonds, Hilda May Irwin Dies, Flu Cancels Train, Salvation Army Campaign, More Volunteers Needed, Death of Infant, Soldiers Inoculated, Sidney Closed, Ad for Ritchie’s, Notice of Closure in Township of Sidney

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 5)

“War Efficiency and National Prosperity. More than a billion and a half dollars distributed in Canada for exported agricultural produce and the products of labor in the fiscal year ending March 31, 1918, has kept Canada busy and prosperous in spite of the war.

Canada’s production in such enormous quantities was made possible only by the money received through Canada’s War Loans. Canada thus was enabled to assist the Allies in their purchases here by establishing financial credits for their use in this country.

Get Ready Now to Buy Victory Bonds.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Died in Toronto. Miss Hilda May Irwin, of Tweed, 19 years old, nurse-in-training at the Western Hospital, Toronto, is dead from influenza, after an illness of eight days.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Flu Cancels Train. A C. N. R. passenger train running between Bannockburn and Yarker, on the Bay of Quinte section, had to be cancelled on account of the illness from influenza of the train crew.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Organizing S. A. Campaign. Mr. Wm. S. Dixon, of Ottawa, one of the leading executive workers in the Salvation Army Dominion War Work Campaign for one million dollars, is in the city a guest at the Hotel Quinte. Mr. Dixon is arranging the preliminary organization in this district for the million-dollar drive. He is a keen and capable young business man, likeable and energetic, of the type which drives through all obstacles to success.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“More Workers Needed. Calls for assistance upon the local volunteer organization continue to come in more rapidly than they can be attended to. Everything possible is being done with the limited number of workers available. Sanitary Inspector Wills is finding many families in urgent need of nursing care. Just outside of the city limits in the locality known as ‘Stoney Lonesome’ five families are all down with the influenza, one family consisting of the parents and seven children being all down. Broth and other delicacies are being furnished fifty families every day.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Death of Infant. An infant son of Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Fairman, 15 Albion street, city, died this morning. The little one had been ill for some days.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Soldiers Inoculated. All the members of the First Depot Battalion stationed in this city were this morning inoculated with influenza vaccine. The inoculation was performed by Majors Bissell and Blakeslee of the Army Medical Corps.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 7)

“Township Conditions. Schools, churches and all places of public assembly in Sidney township have been closed by order of the township authorities. Mr. J. W. Hess, Reeve of Sidney, was in the city to-day and reports the epidemic very severe throughout the township. Many families are all sick and medical attendance is almost impossible to obtain, while in some instances there is no one well enough to look after the live stock.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 8)

“Ritchie’s Warm Comfy Eiderdown Kimonas. Autumn Coats of Extreme Smartness.

Ritchie’s Mens Store. Have You Sent Your Xmas Overseas Box Yet? If you haven’t, then be sure to include some of this exceedingly sensible and practical wearing apparel that the boys over there will be sure to appreciate.

Khaki Cape Gloves, Khaki Gloves, Heavy All Wool Sox, Combination Underwear, Khaki Handkerchiefs, Khaki Color Wool Sweaters, Khaki Sweater Coats.”

The Intelligencer October 25, 1918 (page 8)

“Closing of Schools and Churches. Township of Sidney.

Take Notice that from this date all Schools, Churches and places of public assembly in the Township of Sidney must be closed and remain closed until Monday, November 4, 1918.

By order of the municipal authorities of the Township of Sidney. J. W. Hess, Reeve of Sidney Twp. Belleville, Oct. 25, 1918.”

By | October 25th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Donations for Sick Soldiers, Kenneth Stillman Gardner Dies, Hard Coal for People, Letter from Arthur Rogers, Poster for Victory Bonds, Y.M.C.A. Grant, Cadet Wallbridge in England, Publishing Difficulties, Victory Loan Workers, Influenza Vaccine, Men Volunteers Needed, Flag at Half Mast, Sergeant Richard Allen Clarke Killed in Action, Called by Death: Alfred J. McCrodan, Wilbert C. Eggleton, Alexander McCauley, Ad for Lindsay Player Pianos

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 1)

“For Sick Soldiers. Several donations of fruit and reading matter have been received at the military hospital annex on Church street, for which Lieut.-Col. Smart, officer commanding, is very grateful.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 1)

“Death of Infant. Kenneth Stillman Gardiner, aged eighteen months, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stillman Gardiner, residing at 7 Starling Street, city, died this morning from an attack of pneumonia.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 1)

“Hard Coal To Be Kept For Homes Of People. Toronto. Homes of the people in Ontario are to get the available hard coal hereafter, rather than the Government buildings and the big office buildings. …  There has been a sort of tug-of-war between the Government buildings and the people’s homes in a number of Ontario towns and cities for the anthracite coal. …  The amount of hard coal in question is estimated at 45,000 tons enough to heat 7,500 homes for the entire winter.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 1)

Arthur Rogers

“From Gunner Rogers. Gunner Arthur Rogers, who went overseas with the Cobourg Heavy Battery, writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Rogers, 312 Foster Avenue, as follows: Dear Mother and Dad:—Received your letter of September 2nd and Helen’s of September 7th, which I sent on to Hugh, who is now at the reserve camp. …  One day the first of this week I was over to see Walt Allore and Gerald Roote, and while there Roy Sills, Mac Will and Lyle MacLaren came over so we had quite a reunion just the day before the great fight, so I don’t know whether they are still safe or not.

Well, Mother, I don’t know whether I told you before, but Mr. Payne and myself walked over five miles through mud and rain to the cemetery where my old chum, Roger Porter, is buried. Hugh is writing Mr. and Mrs. Porter. Another one of the old Esmeralda Club has paid the supreme sacrifice and that is Malcolm French. The Band members of the 155th Battalion (now the 21st Batt.) were Roger’s pall bearers and it was Garn Dobbs that told me where he was buried.

Well Helen, dear, you asked me if I am fed up, well I sure am but what is the use of kicking it won’t get me out of it and I am not the least bit sorry, as I know a lot more than I did before, and I don’t think it will be long before we see the end. I don’t think it can last any longer than ten or fifteen years, do you? …

Well, mother, dear, I guess this will be all for now and it is awfully late and I am dead tired. So don’t worry and wait and pray for the best. With love to all the neighbors and write soon. I remain Your loving son, Arthur.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 5)

“On them the Shadow fell. These, our little Canadians, born to freedom, to a heritage of happiness, Germany’s greed would enslave!

Canada—young, high-spirited, independent—must stand firm.

The call will soon come for more of Canada’s wealth. It is your money that is needed—every cent that you by cheerful sacrifice and loving self-denial can lend to your country.

Be ready when the call comes to buy Victory Bonds.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Indignant Citizens. General indignation is expressed by prominent citizens and ratepayers generally at the action of the City Council in rescinding the grant to the Y.M.C.A. overseas work after the same had been included in this year’s estimates and levied for. The uncalled for criticism of the Y.M.C.A. war work has also aroused a deep feeling of resentment, particularly among citizens who have sons at the front and are constantly receiving letters praising the Y.M.C.A. work for the soldiers.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

E. G. Wallbridge

“Cadet Wallbridge in England. Flight Cadet ‘Teddy’ Wallbridge son of Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Wallbridge has arrived safely in England. Cadet Wallbridge, whose age is eighteen past, made application for service in the Royal Canadian Naval Air Service now in process of organization and was one of the comparatively few who passed the strenuous examinations to qualify for officer’s rank. He was one of twelve selected to go overseas at once for special training, and was a chum of Cadet Willet Bedell, of Picton, who died on Thursday last while on board ship en route to England.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Publishing Difficulties. Publishing a newspaper with only a remnant of the necessary staff is a hard proposition. The Intelligencer is hard hit by the prevailing epidemic and a number of the most necessary members of the staff are confined to their beds. Under the circumstances the management confidently relies upon readers and advertisers to accept patiently the limited services until health conditions improve.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Victory Loan Workers. A meeting of Victory Loan workers of the Bay of Quinte district was held here yesterday and the enthusiasm shown augurs well for the successful reaching of the objective of $3,000,000 for this district—and more. Mr. W. B. Deacon, chairman of the district organization, presided. Brief but excellent addresses were made.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Influenza Vaccine. Dr. Yeomans, Medical Officer of Health has fitted up an operating room at the Y. M. C. A. and  was busy vaccinating citizens with influenza preventative serum from 11.30 to 1.30 to-day, a number presenting themselves for inoculation. The treatment will continue as long as the supply of vaccine lasts. The bacteriology laboratory of Queen’s University, Kingston, has issued a bulletin on influenza vaccine which says: ‘The use of this vaccine is still in an experimental stage. It is intended for protective purposes. At present it seems advisable to give 2500 to 3000 million organisms distributed in three doses, 48 hours apart. It may prove advisable to give a fourth dose of 1000 to 1500 million.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Men Volunteers Wanted. Mr. P. F. Brockel, Secretary of the epidemic emergency organization, received a S.O.S. call today from a construction camp of the Hydro Power Commission where the entire force is down with influenza asking for the services of two men volunteers to wait upon the sick.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Flag at Half Mast. The flag from the staff of the city building is floating at half mast out of respect to the late ex-Ald. A. J. McCrodan.”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Killed in Action. Mrs. W. H. Nugent, residing at 64 Chatham street, city, received word on Tuesday, 22nd inst., that her brother, Sergt. R. A. Clarke, had been killed in action on Oct. 11th. Sergt. Clarke enlisted from Coe Hill in the 39th battalion and went to England in June, 1915. After acting as an instructor for some time he went to France in June, 1916, and was attached to the machine gun section of the 21st battalion, where he remained until the time of his death.

Sergt. Clarke was for some years a resident of Coe Hill and as a young man was recognized as a progressive and popular citizen and looked upon as a coming man in the public affairs of his township. He was a member of the I.O.F. and Bancroft Lodge, A. F. & A. M. Societies. Pte. Geo. P. Clarke, a brother was seriously wounded at the battle of the Somme. To the widowed mother and members of the family will be extended the sincere sympathy of many friends.”

[Note: Sergeant Richard Allen Clarke died on October 11, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 385 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Called by Death. Today it is our painful duty to record the death of some well known citizens, including ex-Alderman Alfred J. McCrodan, who passed away last night after a brief illness.

‘Alfred J. McCrodan. Many were the expressions of regret heard upon the street this morning when it became known that Mr. Alfred J. McCrodan, one of Belleville’s well known and popular business men, had joined the silent majority. On Friday last he was taken ill with influenza and pneumonia developed. Despite every attention he passed away at 11 o’clock last night at his late home, Front street. In the year 1868 he was born in Belleville being a son of the late Mr. Robt. McCrodan.

All his life was spent in this city, where he was known to all citizens. For the past few years he had conducted successfully a grocery business. Mr. McCrodan was a public-spirited citizen and at one time served as an Alderman and was also for some time a member of the Board of Education. Deceased was also prominent in secret societies, being a member of Moira Lodge A. F. & A. M., Moira Chapter of Masons, Mizpah Lodge I.O.O.F. and the I.O.F.

In religion he was a Methodist, being a member of the Tabernacle church. A widow and one son, Lieut. Byron McCrodan, overseas, survive, also a sister, Miss Charlotte, of this city. To the bereaved will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of a large circle of friends.’

‘Wilbert C. Eggleton. After a few days illness Mr. Wilbert C. Eggleton passed away last night at his late home, 14 Holloway street, city. An attack of pneumonia was the cause of death. Deceased was an employee of the Bell Telephone Company in this city, being known as a combination man. This position he had occupied for eight years, seven of which he was under the supervision of Mr. C. J. Mooney. The members of the Belleville staff feel that they have lost a faithful and most estimable member, as he was exceedingly popular with the staff and public generally.

He was born in Hastings County on May 16th, 1886, and had lived in this city for a few years. Mr. Eggleton was a member of Holloway street Methodist Church. A widow and three children survive, who will receive the sincere sympathy of many relatives and friends.’

‘Alex. McCauley. Last evening Mr. Alexander McCauley passed away at his late home on Front street. Deceased was 31 years of age and was born in this city, being a son of Mr. Hugh McCauley. For some time deceased conducted a confectionery business in the city. He was unmarried and was a member of St. Michael’s Church. In addition to the parents four brothers and six sisters survive.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 24, 1918 (page 8)

Ad for Lindsay Player Pianos

“Music Maintains Morale. In these trying days of war and sickness music in the home is of incalculable value as a power to fortify our courage and our spirit of determination—in a word, to maintain morale.

To make a finished and accomplished musician in five minutes’ time out of a person who likes music, irrespective of whether or not that person knows a ‘mi’ from a ‘sol’, or a ‘flat’ from a ‘sharp’—that is the mission of the Lindsay Player-Piano in the home.

One Price Only—Cash or Credit. Visit Our Music Roll and Phonograph Salons.

  1. W. Lindsay, Ltd. 249 Front Street, Belleville.”

 

By | October 24th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Emergency Hospital in Trenton, Cancellation of Y.M.C.A. Grant, Lawrence Percy Coxall Wounded, Harry Douglas Barnhardt Wounded, Bruce Manley Griffin Wounded, Captain Sterndale Joseph Murphy Killed in Action, Called by Death: Minnie Matilda Joss, Arthur John Kiser, Sydney Arthur Martin, Montague M. Hogle, Mrs. Albert Stapley, Some Improvement in Epidemic

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 1)

“An Emergency Hospital Opened Quickly At Trenton. Trenton. An impromptu meeting was held at the Trenton Town Hall, Thursday evening, October 17th. …  The meeting was called for the purpose of taking immediate action in preventing the spread of influenza epidemic in town, and to arrange suitable hospital accommodation, if possible, to alleviate the sufferings of the citizens of Trenton, who would require hospital attention. …

Mr. Robert Weddell then made the following proposition, which was gladly accepted: ‘To the Mayor and Corporation of the Town of Trenton. For the purpose of providing a temporary emergency equipped hospital for the citizens of Trenton, …  make the offer, free of charge, costs, rent or expense, of the use of the Button Factory building, with water system for culinary and sanitary purposes, electric light and phone equipment, with the privilege of arranging the interior to suit requirements in changes, additions or equippings whatsoever necessary, the only condition being to hand the premises back, when through with the same, as when handed over in this proposition. …

The proposition of R. Weddell being accepted, the next and main item was to get ready and accomplish the task. …  Robert G. Weddell, with a force of men and teams helped rush the job and on Saturday night, after one and one-half days’ work, the hospital was practically completed and twelve cots in position; in warm, well lighted comfortable rooms—the premises cleaned from cellar to garret, nothing lacking; the balance to complete a fifty-bed hospital, with all equipment, partly in place and fully furnished and equipped on Monday, October 21st. Truly a record-breaking job! …

Having completed this part of the premises, it will now devolve on the other parties, medical and otherwise, to do all they can, to make a success of the Emergency Hospital.”

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 4)

“Doubting Thomases. Did the City Council get a special permit to hold a meeting Monday evening? All other meetings seem to have been cancelled by order of the Board of Health and for all the important business done the Council meeting could just as well have been dispensed with. The members of the Council were forced to listen to a most ill-informed attack on the Y.M.C.A. overseas work by Alderman Robinson, who should have known better. For one letter that can be dug up from any soldier criticizing the Y.M.C.A. a thousand can be secured expressing unbounded appreciation of the splendid services rendered by the Y.M.C.A. …  Canadian newspapers have ceased to print letters from soldiers on active service replying indignantly to adverse criticism of Y.M.C.A. work in the war zone as it was felt that there could be no doubters left; apparently there are a few.”

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. Coxall Wounded. Mrs. Geo. A. Reid, 94 Chatham St., this city, received word this morning that her youngest brother, Pte. L. P. Coxall, was admitted to No. 3 General Hospital, Boulogne, October 13. gunshot wound in right hand and arm. Pte. Coxall, whose home was in Tamworth, enlisted in September, 1916, with the 146th Battalion and was afterwards transferred to the 20th Battalion where he has since served. This is the fourth time he has been wounded.”

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. Barnhardt Wounded. Mr. Charles Barnhardt, 20 Wharf Street, city, has received the official notice that Pte. Harry Douglas Barnhardt, infantry, was officially reported dangerously wounded and admitted to No. 30 Casualty Clearing Station on October 13th. Pte. Barnhardt left Belleville on February 13th of this year and two days later left Kingston with a draft. He had only been one month in France when he was wounded.”

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 5)

“Wounded Second Time. Pte. Bruce M. Griffin, who went overseas with the first Canadian contingent, has been wounded for the second time and is under treatment in England. He is a brother of Mr. G. H. Griffin, C.N.R. city, passenger agent.”

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 5)

“Capt. Murphy Killed. Capt. Sterndale Murphy is reported killed in action. He was born in Belleville the son of Dr. John Murphy, formerly medical superintendent at the Ontario School for the Deaf.”

[Note: Captain Sterndale Joseph Murphy died on October 14, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 476 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 5)

“ ‘Called by Death: Mrs. Alex Joss. Mrs. Alexander Joss, who resided at 15 Brown street, passed away last night after a few days illness. Deceased , whose maiden name was Miss Minnie Matilda Orr, was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Orr, of Thurlow, where she was born in 1866. Nearly all her life was spent in this city, where she was well known. Mrs. Joss was a member of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. In addition to the husband two sons survive namely William J. and Walter Carson, of this city. Two brothers, William I. and John Orr, live in Belleville and four sisters are living. Pneumonia was the cause of death.’

‘Arthur John Kiser. Death last night claimed Mr. Arthur John Kiser as a victim. Deceased resided at 21 Brown Street, city, and was born here 34 years ago, being a son of Mr. Nelson Kiser. He was employed at the G.T.R. shops in this city. Mr. Kiser was a member of the I.O.F. Society. A widow, two sons and one daughter survive, also father, mother and two brothers.’

‘Pte. Sidney A. Martin. Yesterday afternoon Private Sidney Arthur Martin of Peterborough, who was a member of the first depot Battalion, in this city, passed away here after a brief illness from an attack of pneumonia following influenza. Deceased was 30 years of age. The body after being prepared for burial by the Belleville Burial Company, was this morning shipped to Peterborough for interment.’

[Note: Private Sydney Arthur Martin died on October 22, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 468 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

‘Miss M. Hogle. At an early hour this morning Miss Montague M. Hogle died at the home of Mrs. Morrison, 103 Front Street, city. Deceased was an aged maiden lady who was well known in the city and vicinity. She was a daughter of the late Mr. Stephen Hogle and was born in Sidney Township in 1844. All her life was spent in this vicinity. Miss Hogle was a member of the Methodist church for years. Mrs. W. Simmonds of this city is a niece of deceased. The body was taken to the home of Mrs. L. V. Hogle, Octavia street, from whence the funeral will take place tomorrow.’

‘Mrs. Albert Stapley. Mrs. Albert Stapley, who resided in Thurlow Township, just north of the city limits, died this morning after a few days’ illness. Deceased, who was 41 years of age was born in England, but had lived in this vicinity since a child. She was a member of the Methodist church. Her demise is a sad one as she leaves in addition to her husband six young daughters and one son.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 23, 1918 (page 6)

“Epidemic Conditions Show Some Signs of Improvement. The beautiful weather of yesterday and today is helping materially to defeat the influenza epidemic and reports today are more encouraging, indicating that while the critical stage of the disease has been reached with the majority of patients the spread of the epidemic has been materially checked and a few days should see a radical change for the better.

The volunteer’ workers association is very busy and headquarters at the Y.M.C.A. building resembles an army general headquarters with a big battle raging. Many calls for help are still being received and where possible attended to.

Volunteer workers who will go into homes, administer medicine and perform imperative household tasks are still urgently needed as these workers are far too few to meet the demand. Nourishing broths are being made in large quantities at the High School Domestic Science Department where a number of ladies are at work, and jellies and other delicacies for convalescents are also being sent out daily from the same place in volunteer autos.

If more volunteer helpers can be secured for the hospital, it will be possible to take in more patients there, which would help the local situation very much. Chairman Arthur McGie, of the Board of Health, is pleased at the response made to the call for workers and is himself doing all he can to direct the fighting forces.

Mr. Thos. Wills, Fuel Controller and Sanitary Inspector,  is one of the most active workers and is visiting homes where sickness prevails to see that there is no lack of fuel. Serious cases he is reporting to the emergency organization. Chief Brown, of the City Fire Department, has made a canvass of the flat section of the business district and found conditions there very good with little emergency assistance needed.

Dr. Clinton, Provincial Health Officer, is busy dealing out preventative vaccine and inoculating workers. A survey of the whole local situation indicates that conditions are improving.”

 

 

By | October 23rd, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Epidemic Not at Crest, Willing Workers Wanted, Relief Work for Epidemic, Called by Death: David Andrews, Alice Beatrice Adams, Karl Jackson Stortts, Private Charles Henry Ransom Wounded, Captain Mackenzie Waters Receives Military Cross, Flu Vaccine Here, Private Joseph James Steward Dies of Wounds, Ad for Wm. Thompson Co. Funeral Directors, Pneumonia Jackets, Y.M.C.A. Grant Rescinded

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 1)

“Epidemic Is Not Yet At Crest. Toronto. That the Spanish influenza throughout the Province has not yet reached its crest was the assertion of Dr. J. W. S. McCullough, Chief Officer of Health for the province. …  ‘The need of graduate and volunteer nurses and physicians is very great. There are practically no more trained nurses to be had in Toronto. Many towns and cities have already been supplied with volunteer help.’ …

The nurses of the city hospitals are being vaccinated with a preventive vaccine and on Sunday Mr. McCullough wired to all the hospitals in Ontario to advise the number of doses required for their nursing staff. The Provincial Board will endeavor to supply vaccine for the use of the nursing and medical staffs in order to enable them to carry on their work. The vaccine is being prepared by the Connaught Laboratories.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 1)

“Willing Workers Wanted To Help Fight The Epidemic In The Cause Of Humanity. It is reported that many families in Belleville are ill with the Spanish influenza—every member of the family sick in bed with no one to wait upon them, administer medicine as prescribed by the family physician, and wait upon the sick.

Physicians and trained nurses are working night and day and unless volunteer assistants come to their aid are in great danger themselves of sickness and death from the disease aggravated by overwork. The hospital is crowded with patients and several of the doctors and nurses are sick—up to Saturday two nurses had died from pneumonia, their natural resistance no doubt broken down from overwork—heroic self-sacrifice in the cause of humanity.

The city Board of Health is making every effort to fight the epidemic and needs the assistance of all citizens, men and women to prevent the spread of the malady as much as possible and to try and stamp it out.

An emergency hospital will be opened and volunteer help when available sent to families in need of assistance.

A Citizens’ Committee has been organized to co-operate with the local Board of Health in the formation of a branch of the Ontario Emergency Volunteer Health Auxiliary, under the authority of the Provincial Government and under the direction of the Provincial Board of Health. Volunteer nurses will wear the official badge—’ONTARIO S.O.S.’ (Sister of Service) and receive full instructions.

The call for service is urgent and includes: Women, Men, Boys and Girls, to act as nurses, messengers, etc. Use of private motor cars. Donations of jellies, jams, fruit, etc., and cotton cloths. Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Campfire Girls, and others can render useful service.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 2)

“Relief Work Is Vigorously Pressed. The emergency organization formed to fight the epidemic in Belleville is hard at work, the mainspring of the organization being located at headquarters in the Y.M.C.A. building, where Mr. P. F. Brockel is doing splendid service directing operations and answering many telephone calls and personal applications for emergency assistance. …

At the High School Domestic Science Department a number of ladies are busily engaged making broths and nourishing delicacies for convalescents and these are sent out twice a day to a number of families by automobile. This work is in charge of Misses Libby and Dulmage of the High School Domestic Science Department assisted by local ladies.

Volunteers are needed to visit a number of houses where there are little attentions to be given to sick people who can get along without continuous attendance. There are enough volunteer motor cars for the present.

Dr. Clinton expects to receive a supply of preventative vaccine which he has requisitioned from the Provincial Public Health Department. …  Reports are coming in continuously of families in need of attention, one case concerned a family where the parents and nine children are all sick. Volunteer nurses are wearing masks to avoid contagion.

Chairman Arthur McGie, of the Board of Health, states that the general situation in the city is rather encouraging, but while the disease does not seem to be spreading in the majority of cases, it has reached its most critical stage necessitating for the patient all the care and attention possible to give by the volunteer staff available. The opening of an emergency hospital in the Marchmont Home is not possible as yet on account of difficulties in securing the staff necessary including a competent cook and supervisors.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 3)

“Called By Death: ‘David Andrews. Mr. David Andrews, a well known machinist of this city, passed away last night after some days illness. Deceased was 50 years of age and was born in Thurlow Township. He had resided in Belleville the greater portion of his life. Mr. Andrews was a member of the Methodist church. A widow, three sons and two daughters survive. The sons are J. Clifford, William B. and Edgar, and the daughter is Miss Edna J., all of this city. Two brothers and three sisters survive.’

‘Alice Beatrice Adams. From a complication of disease, Miss Alice Beatrice Adams passed away yesterday afternoon at the residence of her mother, Mrs. W. H. Adams, Foster Avenue, city. Deceased was an estimable young lady who had many friends in this city who deeply regret her demise. Miss Adams was previous to her illness engaged as a saleslady in the shoe store of her brother, Mr. W. O. Adams, and was deservedly popular with the public. She was a member of the Baptist Church. A mother and brother, W. O., of this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Rev. A. N. Braund, of Three Rivers, Mich., and Mrs. C. A. Moore, of this city, survive, and to them will be extended the sincere sympathy of many friends.’

‘Karl J. Stortts. Karl J. Stortts, who passed away at the home of Mrs. Wilson, his grandmother, at 67 Cedar Street, was born in Valleyfield, Quebec, in the year 1899. He was the only son of Raphael Stortts. His boyhood days were spent at Wellington, Prince Edward County, where he was a member of the Methodist Sabbath School and Young People’s Society. After finishing his education at Belleville High School he entered the Bank of Nova Scotia continuing with that institution until he attained a trustworthy and prominent position.

He came to this city for a few holidays, the first obtainable since the outbreak of the war. He was a promising young man of sterling character, good judgment and strict morals. He leaves a sorrowing father, his mother having predeceased him some years ago. “Surely man is as the flower that come forth and is cut down.”

Yesterday afternoon the body was taken to Picton for interment. Rev. J. N. Clarry conducted services at the home of Mrs. Wilson and Rev. Mr. Brown officiated at the interment. The bearers were immediate relatives of the deceased.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Ransom Wounded. Mr. Henry Ransom, residing at 292 Charles street, city is in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 304221 Pte. Chas Henry Ransom, infantry, officially reported admitted 2 Australian General Hospital, Wimereux, Oct. 13, gunshot wounds, multiple.’ Pte. Ransom enlisted and left Belleville with the 155th Battalion, and on August 17th of this year was gassed. The many friends of the young man in Belleville will hope for his recovery.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 7)

Mackenzie Waters

“Awarded Military Cross. Mr. D. M. Waters, of this city, received a cable this morning from his son, Capt. Mackenzie Waters, who was wounded on Sept. 27th, saying: ‘Doing splendidly. At Perkins-Bull hospital. Got Military Cross.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 7)

“ ‘Flu’ Vaccine Here. A limited quantity of influenza preventative vaccine has been received by Dr. Clinton, Provincial Board of Health representative for this district, and can be obtained from him by physicians requiring the same. Some of the local physicians have already been using the vaccine.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Steward Died of Wounds. The following is the official message received by Mrs. Charles Steward, residing at 7 Pine street, in reference to the death of her son: ‘Deeply regret to inform you 636892 Pte. Jos. Jas. Steward, machine gun corps, officially reported died of wounds, 22 casualty clearing station. Oct. 11, gunshot wound, leg.’

Pte. Steward enlisted and went overseas with the 155th Battalion from this city. He was a popular young man and his many friends will regret to learn of his death. To the bereaved will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of all citizens.”

[Note: Private Joseph James Steward died on October 11, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 507 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 8)

Ad for Thompson Funeral Directors

“Our complete Motor Equipment enables us to serve any distance without additional cost.

The Wm. Thompson Co. Embalmers and Funeral Directors. Night phone 295, Private Chapel, Day phone 62.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 8)

“Pneumonia Jackets. An emergency committee of The Canadian War Contingent Association, 62 West Bridge St., will endeavor to supply free of charge Pneumonia Jackets and other necessary supplies to Doctors and those caring for the sick during the present epidemic. Phone 499—167—600. Donations for above will be gratefully received.”

The Intelligencer October 22, 1918 (page 8)

“$6,000 Grant To Y.M.C.A. War Work Rescinded By City Council. Ald. Robinson moved, seconded by Ald. St. Charles that the motion passed on April 8th, 1918, granting $6,000 to the Y. M. C. A. be rescinded and is hereby rescinded.

Ald. Robinson spoke strongly in support of the motion and read a letter which Ald. Donohue had received from a soldier who is at the front, which stated that the writer had never received anything free from the Y.M.C.A. The Alderman said he had heard that the boys over there were having a jolly good time and living on the fat of the land. He had also heard of 75 cents being charged for a dish of ice cream by the Y.M.C.A. He did not think it right to give the money, especially as the K. of C. had not asked for a grant and they would have to help pay for the grant if it was made. …

Ald. Treverton did not think it was right to ridicule an institution like the Y.M.C.A., which has done and is doing good work.

The motion of Ald. Robinson prevailed, those voting for it being Aldermen Robinson, St. Charles, Hagerman and Hanna.”

By | October 22nd, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: War Orders in Canada, Report Neighbours in Need, Emergency Hospital to Open, Depot Battalion Soldiers, Soldiers of Mercy, Ad for Dominion Rubber, The Intelligencer Hard Hit, Mother and Children Ill, Volunteer Workers Needed, Called by Death: William Kent, Marian Foster, Irene Houle, Timothy Martin Hogan, Robert Ross Yott, Ernest Gregory Crowe

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 1)

“$1,200,000,000 in War Orders Have Been Placed in Canada. The Imperial Munitions Board has placed $1,200,000,000 of war orders in Canada to date. As a result of this huge outlay of money business activity throughout the Dominion has reached a climax during the year 1918 and the whole people are getting the benefit. …  For the coming year orders amounting to $500,000,000 are to be placed. They will go to manufacturers and sundry other interests in the Dominion and will have to be financed to a considerable extent out of the proceeds of the forthcoming Victory Loan. …  Eighty-five per cent of the manufacturers are operating on a war basis. Canada’s trade returns show the stupendous strides our business activities have taken since the war began, largely through the ability of the Government to finance some of the purchases of the Imperial Government.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 1)

“How Are Your Neighbours? Do They Need Assistance? Investigate and Report. A Citizens’ Committee, co-operating with the local Board of Health has been organized to assist in preventing as far as possible the spread of the influenza epidemic. Every citizen can be of service by investigating in their own immediate neighborhood and reporting cases in need of volunteer assistance.

Visit your neighbors at once and ascertain if they are in need of outside assistance, and report at once to central headquarters, Y. M. C. A. building, phone 413. It is reported that in many families every member of the household is ill and there is no one to wait upon the sufferers. Particulars of these cases should be communicated to headquarters at once so that everything possible can be done to relieve their necessities and prevent further spread of the disease.

Not Charity, But Public Service. This is not charity by any manner of means, but public necessity, and no one should hesitate for a moment to take advantage of any help the Board of Health and Citizens’ Committee can offer. The members of Local Board of Health realize that it is in the public interest to bend every effort to prevent the further spreading of this disease and save lives which might be sacrificed by lack of proper care and attention. Get busy in your own neighborhood and report at once.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 2)

“Organized To Fight Epidemic Emergency Hospital To Be Opened. The alarming spread of the prevailing epidemic of influenza, the many pneumonia cases resulting therefrom and the reports of entire families being confined to bed with no one to wait upon them has resulted in prompt steps being taken by the local Board of Health to deal with the situation in a systematic manner. …  While the greatest need is for women workers, the services of men and even boys and girls can be used, and everyone who can possibly do so should enlist for service at once.

Another meeting was held yesterday afternoon in the Y.M.C.A. building to discuss ways and means of combatting the epidemic. …  A resolution was passed upon motion of Messrs. Ackerman and Bailey that the Board of Education and School Principals be communicated with at once and requested to form an organization of teachers to cover the section served by each school, with headquarters in the school buildings, to act in co-operation with the general organization and render any assistance necessary to families where all are sick. It was felt that the teachers with their knowledge of first aid methods and initiative would be valuable aids in combatting the epidemic and rendering assistance to families unable to procure trained nurses.

The management of the Marchmont Home have offered that building to the Board of Health for an emergency hospital and upon motion of Messrs. Woodley and Bailey it was recommended that the Board of Health accept the offer and take immediate steps to equip the building at once for hospital purposes and secure the necessary staff.

Upon motion of Messrs. Deacon and Sinclair it was decided to request Chief Brown of the Fire Brigade to arrange for the firemen to canvass the business district, call upon people living in flats above the stores and ascertain what assistance is needed in cases of sickness.

Domestic science teachers volunteer. Arrangement will be made to utilize the kitchen of the Y.M.C.A. building for the preparation of broths and other nourishing delicacies for convalescents. Miss Libby and Miss Dulmage of the High School Domestic Science department have volunteered their services for this work. Mrs. Ritchie of the High School staff is already at work in charge of the Diet Kitchen of the General Hospital.

Donation of the use of private cars will be greatly appreciated and materially assist in the work of relief. Donations of jam, jellies, etc., can also be used to advantage. Cotton cloths are also needed in large quantities.

Anyone willing to assist in any way should report at once to the Y.M.C.A. Building, or Mr. Brockell, Secretary of the Citizens Committee, or Miss Fraleck, Assistant Secretary.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 4)

“Remember the Soldiers. The soldiers of the Depot Battalion quartered at the armories are practically quarantined as a precautionary measure on account of the epidemic of influenza and must be having a rather dull time of it confined to barracks, although they seem to be very cheerful under the circumstances. There would seem to be an opportunity for patriotic citizens to donate reading matter, magazines, etc., to help relieve the tedium of confinement, and concerts no doubt could be arranged by local entertainers which would be appreciated by the rank and file alike.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 4)

“Soldiers of Mercy. The battle being fought against the epidemic of Spanish influenza by the physicians and nurses is worthy of all praise. Night and day they expose themselves to the disease to alleviate suffering and save lives where possible, and in many cases fall victims themselves to the disease as the result of over-exertion, lack of sleep and consequent weakening of the physical powers of resistance. A number of doctors and nurses have died from the disease in Ontario and many are ill. …  Several nurses at Belleville hospital are in a critical condition and two have died.

The heroism of the physicians and nurses in this epidemic may not be commemorated by the presentation of Victoria Crosses, but the medical profession should be haloed with a greater dignity and respect in the hearts of the people for such unselfish sacrifice and bravery in the face of great danger.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 4)

“Canada Needs Her Man-Power and Her Woman-Power. Aye—and her child-power, too: she wants no sick, this winter—no offices made inefficient, no homes disarranged, nor schools poorly attended—because of colds and grippe and tonsillitis, due to wet feet.

Wear rubbers and keep well. Get rubbers for the children so they can keep well.

To wear your $10 or $15 shoes in the rain or snow is poor economy when good rubbers that cost so little save your shoes so much.

Dominion Rubber System. Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co. Limited and Associated Companies.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 5)

“Publishing Under Difficulty. In common with all other industries The Intelligencer has been hard hit by the epidemic and only a small remnant of the staff remain to ‘carry on.’ The indulgence of readers and advertisers is requested by the management during the trying time when the service will necessarily be greatly affected by prevailing conditions.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 5)

“Mother and Kiddies All Sick. There are, no doubt, many cases of great hardship caused by the prevailing epidemic where every member of the family is ill at the same time. A typical case is that of a family where the mother and four children are very ill and the only well member of the family found was a baby about a month old.

The father, the late Capt. Cousins, was one of the first victims of Spanish influenza followed by pneumonia and died at Oswego recently. Fortunately a volunteer nurse (Sister of Service) was obtained by the emergency organization working from Y.M.C.A. headquarters and is helping the little family fight the scourge.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 5)

“Brighten the Corner. The prospects are that not half enough volunteer workers can be enlisted to meet the demand. No one should hesitate to register from the belief that there will be a surplus of workers. There is no possible chance of having too many as it is estimated there are over 2,000 cases of influenza in Belleville today. This may be a high or a low estimate but it is certain that there is more work than there will be workers.

However, if everybody does their bit and registers for what time they can spare, gets busy in their own immediate neighborhood helping their neighbors and generally ‘Brightens the Corners Where You Are’ great good will be accomplished and the spread of the disease checked.”

The Intelligencer October 21, 1918 (page 5)

“Called by Death. A number of deaths have occurred in the city and vicinity since Saturday, the majority being victims of pneumonia following the influenza.

‘William Kent. William Kent, aged 14 years, son of Mr. William Kent, 2nd Concession of Thurlow Township, died on Saturday evening after a few days’ illness.’

‘Marian Foster. Miss Marian Foster, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Foster, of Trenton, died last evening in that town. Deceased was a teacher in a public school in that town and was deservedly popular with the teaching profession and pupils.’

‘Mrs. Leo Houle. Mrs. Irene Houle, wife of Mr. Joseph Houle, 57 Church Street, died on Saturday afternoon from an attack of pneumonia. Deceased was in her 27th year and was a daughter of the late Mr. Louis Hebert of this city. She was a member of St. Michael’s Church. In addition to the husband two daughters, Irene and Clare survive.’

‘Timothy M. Hogan. On Sunday Mr. Timothy Martin Hogan died at his late home, 12 Strachan Street, city. Deceased was 30 years of age and was a son of Mr. Timothy Hogan, of this city. He was born here and lived here all his life. Deceased was a G. T. R. conductor, having been in the employ of the railway for some time. He was a member of St. Michael’s church and was also a member of the Brotherhood of Trainmen. A widow but no family survive. His parents, six brothers and two sisters are living.’

‘Robert R. Yott. Mr. Robert Ross Yott died last night at his late home, 237 Moira Street west, in this city. Deceased was in his 29th year and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Yott of Consecon, Prince Edward County, where he was born. Mr. Yott was a G. T. R. telegraph operator, and had resided in Belleville for some time. He was well and favorably known. Deceased was a member of the Anglican Church. A wife, two sons, Jack and Joseph, and one daughter, Gena, survive. The body will be taken to Albury, Ameliasburg Township, for interment.’

‘Ernest G. Crowe. Mr. Ernest Gregory Crowe, a well-known G. T. R. conductor who resided at 273 Charles Street, city, passed away on Sunday morning from an attack of pneumonia. Deceased was in his 39th year and was born at Guelph being a son of Mr. Edwin B. Crowe, who resides at Ernestown. For the past three years deceased had been a resident of Belleville. He was a member of St. Michael’s Church and a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen. Mr. Crowe was deservedly popular with his fellow employees and the public generally. A widow and three children survive.’ ”

 

 

  

By | October 21st, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Wants Church People to Motor, Men and Women Wanted to Fight Influenza, Anti-Spitting Bylaw, Poster for Victory Bonds, Ad for Dr. Chase’s Menthol Bag, Face Masks Urged, Sunday Motoring Allowed, Post Office Staff Ill, No Quorum for Board of Education, Archie Hall Missing and Believed Wounded, Steamer Laid Up, Measles at Children’s Shelter, Joe Hill Killed in Action, Help the Doctors, Alfred Earle Wessels Wounded, Voluntary Aid Wanted, Called by Death: Edna Delong, Davidena Sarah McLeod, Queena Gardner, No Church Services on Sunday

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 1)

“Wants Church People To Motor on Sunday. Toronto. ‘I want it to be understood,’ said Dr. Hastings, yesterday, ‘that no order has been issued to hold only one church service on Sunday. …  We are simply making a request of them, just as people were asked to observe a gasless Sunday. And by the way,’ he added, ‘I have asked the Dominion Fuel Controller to call off the gasless Sunday so that people can use their motor cars for health-giving trips on Sunday next. The reason that I have strongly advised churches to hold only one service on Sunday, and that one in the evening if possible, is to permit people to be as much in the open air as possible on that day.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 1)

“Bear Ye One Another’s Burdens Men and Women Wanted. There is a great need for willing workers, men and women who have the time and the Christian spirit of helpfulness to go into homes where the prevailing epidemic has laid low every member of the family and left no one to do even the most necessary household tasks. Women volunteer nurses are needed and there is also much that men can do to help their unfortunate neighbors.

An association has been formed with headquarters at the Y.M.C.A. building. P. F. Brockell, Secretary, to register willing workers and receive requests for assistance from families hit hard by the epidemic. Let us all do our bit—this is national service and Christian service. Enlist now!!”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 4)

“Germ Distributors. It is against the law to spit on the sidewalks, besides being a disgusting and dangerous habit—dangerous to the health of citizens who have to breathe the germ-laden air polluted by people careless or ignorant. In view of the epidemic now raging special care should be taken to enforce the anti-spitting bylaw. A few police court examples would have a salutary effect and citizens should co-operate with the police in the detection of offenders.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 5)

Poster for Victory Bonds“When Canada Promises to Pay. When you loan money to Canada you know beyond all possible question your money is safe—the security for the loan indisputable.

Like the Victory Loan 1917, it will be welcomed by all loyal Canadians.

Get ready to do your share in buying Victory Bonds.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 5)

“Prevent the ‘Flu’ by wearing Dr. Chase’s Menthol Bag.

Since 1510 influenza has periodically swept over the known world. The last big epidemic in this country was in 1889, when almost every person in every home was brought down. But the present form, known as Spanish ‘Flu’ because it started in Spain, seems to be a most fatal variety on account of the quickness with which it develops into bronchial pneumonia. Hence the wisdom of preventing infection by every means possible, and our suggestion is to ‘Wear a Menthol Bag.’

We have arranged for the manufacture of thousands of these Menthol Bags, and while they last shall give them away to the first persons who send in the coupon printed below.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 6)

“Medical Man Urges Use of Face Mask. Toronto. The use of the face mask in combating the spread of influenza epidemic is advocated by Dr. Murray McFarlane, 190 Bloor street, who has just returned from a trip to the various centres in the United States, where the disease is prevalent. This mask, which is in the form of a handkerchief, is made of gauze or cheesecloth, and is placed over the nose and mouth and fastened at the back of the head. …

‘The Government should take immediate steps to allow the free use of alcohol during the present conditions,’ declares the doctor. ‘In the pneumonia stage, a little bit of whiskey is the best thing in the world for the patient. While I am a strong prohibitionist, I believe that at this time the regulations should be somewhat relaxed, and the use of alcohol freely allowed, as it is an excellent stimulant during the depressive stages of the disease.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Gasoline Ban Lifted. The Dominion Fuel Controller has lifted the ban on Sunday gasoline using and motor car owners can take out their cars tomorrow as usual.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Post Office Staff Ill. The prevailing epidemic of influenza has stricken no less than six employees of the local post office. Post master Gillen appreciated much the services of Mrs. D. M. Waters, who kindly consented to assist at the office.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“No Quorum. As was expected no meeting of the Board of Education was held last night. Only two members and the Secretary-Treasurer put in an appearance.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Hall Missing. Mrs. Archie Hall has received word that her husband, Pte. Archie Hall, who left with the Bugle Band of the 59th Battalion, is reported missing and believed to be wounded. Previous to enlisting he was employed as fireman on the G. T. R. His wife and child are now in Brockville.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Steamer Laid Up. Spanish influenza struck the crew of the steamer Belleville, plying between Montreal and Toronto, so hard that the vessel was forced to tie up at Kingston. Only three members of the crew were able to carry on. The vessel was in Belleville port on Tuesday.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Remember the Children. There are now twenty-one cases of measles at the Children’s Shelter among the thirty-four children quartered there. Captain Ruston, Inspector for the Children’s Aid Society, yesterday brought two children from Cloyne and through the kindness of the Marchmont Home Authorities they were placed in that institution until the Shelter is free of the epidemic of measles. There are no serious cases and Captain Ruston would appreciate donations of fruit and other delicacies which will be appreciated by the children during the convalescent period.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Had Won Military Medal. Mrs. Bernadette Hill, of Deseronto, this week received the sad message of the death of her son, Corp. Joe Hill who was killed in action on September 30. Corp. Hill enlisted in the 26th Battery at Kingston on August 8th, 1915 and after training was completed sailed on the R.M.S. Metagama from Halifax for England and from there sailed in January to France, where he has been almost continually till the time of his death.

He was through all the big battles of the past two years, including Passchendaele and the Somme, having had only twenty days’ leave in all this time. Corp. Hill was a soldier of the first order and had won the Military Medal which his proud, but sorrowing mother now has in her possession. He was soon to have received his commission as Lieutenant. A brother, James, is in the American Cavalry in France.”

[Note: Corporal Joseph Bernard Hill died on September 30, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 429 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Help the Doctors. The city physicians are rushed off their feet by the many calls upon their services night and day on account of the influenza epidemic. The medical men are human like the rest of us and there is a limit to their endurance. The public can materially assist the doctors by showing consideration in the present emergency and not calling in the doctors unless absolutely necessary.

Whenever possible calls for the services of a physician to the homes should be made in the morning so that the calls can be grouped to the best advantage and the day mapped out in advance. When the doctor makes a call and leaves instructions he should not be called in again right away unless in emergency as there are many others awaiting his care and attention. A little thoughtfulness in this emergency will go far to assist the doctors and render them more efficient.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. A. E. Wessels Wounded. Mr. Walter Wessels residing at 71 Lewis Street, city, was yesterday in receipt of the following telegram from the Director of Records. ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that 3055,761 Pte. Alfred Earle Wessels, infantry, officially reported seriously ill at 20 General Hospital, Danges, Camiers, October 15th. Gunshot Wound in Right Thigh.’

Pte. Wessels is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wessels and enlisted and went overseas with a draft from Kingston. Previous to enlistment he was employed as a painter at Finnegan’s Carriage Co., of this city. ‘Alf’ as he was familiarly called was a popular young man and his many friends in this city will hope for his speedy recovery.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Volunteer Nurses And Workers To Fight Influenza Epidemic. In compliance with a request from Mr. A. McGie, Chairman of The Belleville Board of Health, an emergency meeting of the ladies to consider ways and means of organizing the city for volunteers in nursing and performing other duties in combatting the influenza epidemic, a meeting was held in the Y.M.C.A. parlors last evening and was well attended. A number of ladies of the city, who are prominent in all philanthropic work were present and a few gentlemen.

Mr. McGie was chairman and stated the object of the meeting. He said that it had been discovered that there were a number of homes in Belleville where every member was sick from the prevailing epidemic and with no person to do anything for them. Volunteers were necessary not only for nursing but doing household work. Already some had volunteered their services.

Dr. Clinton, of this city, who is a member of the Provincial Board of Health, referred to the fact that in various parts of the Province associations known as the Ontario Emergency Volunteer Auxiliary were being formed and something similar should be done in Belleville. He was prepared to do what he could and no doubt the physicians of the city would help all they could.

It was decided to organize the city for work on the line of volunteer help and the following officers were selected. President—Mr. A. McGie. Secretary—P. F. Brockell. Assistant Secretary—Miss Fraleck. Executive Committee—D. V. Sinclair, Dr. Clinton, J. O. Herity and A. G. Davis.

At the Y.M. C.A. building a register will be kept of the names of all people who require help also the names of those volunteering. Doctors and others having to do with the sick are requested to report cases where help of any description is needed.

A meeting of the Executive to perfect organization will be held at the Y.M.C.A. this evening.”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 7)

“Called By Death. ‘Mrs. R. L. Delong. Mrs. R. L. Delong passed away last evening in the city from an attack of pneumonia. Deceased, who was 19 years of age was a daughter of Mr. L. A. Wartman, of Collins Bay, where she was born. She resided at 18 Dunbar Street, city. Mrs. Delong was a member of Holloway Street Methodist Church. Her husband but no family survives. The body will be taken to Cataraqui for interment.’

‘Davidena S. McLeod. Davidena Sarah McLeod, aged 8 years died yesterday afternoon at the family residence station street. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald McLeod and was a lovable child. She was a pupil of Queen Victoria School and a member of the Salvation Army Sunday School, near the G. T. R. Station.’

‘Queena Gardner. Miss Queena Gardner, a nurse-in-training at the hospital here, passed away yesterday from an attack of pneumonia, following the influenza. Deceased was about 21 years of age and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Gardner residing near Bayside, Sidney Township. Miss Gardner was a young lady who was well known in the city and vicinity and was highly esteemed. She was a member of the Methodist Church. The remains were taken to Trenton and prepared for burial.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 19, 1918 (page 8)

“No Church Services on Sunday. The Belleville Ministerial Association at a meeting held this week expressed itself in hearty accord with the Board of Health in closing all places of public assembly during the prevailing epidemic. Its members are seeking to serve in every way they can the afflicted homes and to do all in their power to stay the progress of the disease.

The Ministerial Association expresses confidence that the approaching Sabbath day will be observed in a religious way by all Christian people in our city. In the absence of public worship it is hoped there will be some form of family worship in every home. Where no fuller form is possible the reading of a portion of scripture and repeating of the Lord’s Prayer in an attitude of devotion is recommended. We believe great blessing will come to us as a people if this time of stress produces a revival of family religion. C. T. Scott, president, D. C. Ramsay, secretary.”

 

By | October 19th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Letter of Sympathy for Alexander Beaton’s Mother, Obsequies: Joseph Longden, Women Needed to Care for Influenza Families, Called by Death: Violet May Sanderson, Poster for Victory Loan, Doctor Prepares Vaccine, Queen’s University Closes, Andrew Baxter Hall Wounded, Christmas Boxes for Overseas

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 1)

“Letter of Sympathy From Major Vandewater. Mrs. F. Beaton, 350 Bleecker Avenue, city, has received the following letter from Major R. Vanderwater, in connection with the death of her soldier son, Pte. Alexander Beaton, killed in action on September 2.

In the Field, Sept. 21st, 1918. Mrs. F. Beaton, 350 Bleecker Avenue, Belleville, Ontario, Canada. Dear Madam,—No doubt previous to receipt of this letter you have received the official notification of the death of your son, No. 455096, Pte. A. Beaton. During the period of his connection with the Battalion he, by his unassuming manner and the willingness in which all duties for which he was selected were carried out, won high commendation of his officers and respect of his comrades.

His supreme sacrifice for the great cause for which we fight was a matter of great sorrow among his many friends here who join with me in the expression of sincere sympathy for you in your bereavement. Yours in sympathy, R. Vanderwater, Major, O.C., 2nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment.”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 2)

“Obsequies. ‘Joseph Longden. Many were yesterday afternoon in attendance at the funeral of the late Mr. Joseph Longden of this city. At the family residence, 218 George Street, Rev. Dr. Scott of Bridge Street church, and Rev. J. Capman, of Picton, conducted an impressive service. Interment took place at Belleville cemetery. Many floral designs were contributed by friends. The bearers were: Messrs. N. Hall, W. Rickley, E. Hicks, F. Wheeler, B. Gerow and W. A. Walsh.’ ”

[Note: Age: 30 years, 9 months. Cause of death: Influenza-Pneumonia.]

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 2)

“Notice. Meeting of ladies of the city is called for this evening at 8 p.m., in Y. M. C. A. Parlors, to consider what can be done to procure volunteers, nurses and assistants to help those families who are suffering from influenza, and are in need of help. Any one interested is welcome to attend and organize for the work. Any persons not able to attend this meeting and who are able to help will please send their name and address to the Y.M.C.A. A. McGie, Chairman Belleville Board of Health.”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 2)

“Called by Death: ‘Violet M. Sanderson. Miss Violet May Sanderson, nurse in training at the Belleville Hospital, passed away at noon to-day from an attack of pneumonia. Deceased had been in training at the hospital here since June of last year and was exceedingly popular with the staff and public.

She was 22 years of age, and was born at Peterboro, being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Sanderson. She was a member of the Baptist church. In addition to the parents two brothers and three sisters survive. The brothers are Clayton and Harvey at home, and the sisters are Mrs. Joseph Bullied and Misses Ruby and Leita, all of Peterboro. The body was taken to Tickell & Sons undertaking establishment, where it was prepared for burial and this evening was shipped to Peterboro.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 4)

Poster for Victory Loan“When will it end? Thousands upon thousands, endless thousands, hold their lives cheap as the price of Victorious Peace.

And we—as we watch from afar their heroic efforts—may we be able to say, that the little we at home could do, we have done.

Another opportunity to lend your individual weight to the blow that will shorten the war comes with the offering of Victory Bonds about to be made. Let not the privilege to do your share find you unprepared.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Growing Spanish Germs. Dr. G. B. Reed, assistant professor of botany, and lecturer in bacteriology at Queen’s University, believes he has isolated the Spanish influenza germ. He is growing the germs by millions and has prepared a vaccine with which he has already inoculated some two hundred persons with good results. Each cubic centimetre of the serum contained about a thousand million germs, and about three thousand cubic centimetres was used yesterday.”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Queen’s University Closes. Theatres, schools and churches in Kingston are closed and hospitals and dispensaries are closed to visitors. The local medical and surgical faculty will place at the General Hospital fifth year medical students, who will be given power to attend cases. Queen’s University closed its doors at noon yesterday and has postponed the annual convocation.”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 7)

“Driver Hall Wounded. Mrs. A. B. Hall has received word that her husband, Driver A. B. Hall has been wounded in the left arm. He left here with the 80th Battalion and was employed as fireman on the G. T. R. previous to enlisting. His wife and child are now in Hamilton.”

The Intelligencer October 18, 1918 (page 8)

“Wanted. The Quinte Chapter I.O.D.E. is preparing Xmas boxes for Belleville boys overseas. Will friends kindly leave names and correct addresses with Mrs. (Dr.) Dolan, 17 Victoria Ave., or office Y.M.C.A.”

By | October 18th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Letter of Sympathy for William Woods’s Wife, Poster for Victory Loan, Kenneth Livingstone MacMillan Gassed, Sailors’ Relief Fund, Women Wanted to Help Nurses, Cecil Everett Brown Killed in Action, Called by Death: Mary Winnifred Losee, Keitha Keller, Harry Bolton, Florence Wickett, Clesson John Dickinson, Newbold D. Carter, Esther Newberry, Arthur Eugene Wrightmeyer, Woolworth’s Cancels Sale Due to Flu

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 3)

“Minister of Militia Express Sympathy. Mrs. S. Woods, who resides at 20 Water Street, received the following letter from the Minister of Militia and Defence. It is in connection with the death of her husband, who was killed in action on Sept. 2nd. Ottawa, Oct. 11, 1918.

Dear Mrs. Woods,—I desire to express to you my very sincere sympathy in the recent death of your husband, No. 1027643, Private William Woods, Canadian Expeditionary Force, who, in sacrificing his life at the front in action with the enemy, has rendered the highest service of a worthy citizen.

The heavy loss which you and the nation have sustained would indeed be depressing were it not redeemed by the knowledge that the brave comrade for whom we mourn performed his duties fearlessly and well as became a good soldier, and gave his life for the great cause of Human Liberty and the Defence of the Empire.

Again extending to you in your bereavement my condolence and heartfelt sympathy, I am, Yours faithfully, S. C. Mewburn, Minister of Militia and Defence.”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 6)

Poster for Victory Loan“Armed to the teeth. The Canadian Army is fully equipped for War. Canada’s war loans have made the glory of the Canadian Army possible—they have been Victory Loans in fact, as well as in name.

It is unthinkable, is it not, that our men should lack any implement of war that money will buy!

The money for the needs of our army will be provided by Canada’s Victory Loan, 1918. Canadians at home will see to that.

Issued by Canada’s Victory Loan Committee in co-operation with the Minister of Finance of the Dominion of Canada.”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 7)

Kenneth McMillan

“Corp. K. L. MacMillan Gassed. Word has been received in this city from the Director of Records at Ottawa that Corp. Kenneth L. MacMillan had again been the victim of German gas and has been admitted to No. 30 Canadian Clearing Station. He was well known in Belleville and is a nephew of Mrs. Tower and Miss Bella MacMillan of 281 George St., city. Recently Corp. MacMillan had been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field.”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Ladies Help Sailors. The Sailors Relief Fund has been further augmented by the sum of one hundred dollars voted by Quinte Chapter Daughters of the Empire, a check for which was received by Mr. Alex. Ray this morning. This brings Belleville contributions up to a total of two thousand, one hundred and fifty dollars.”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Women Workers Wanted. Requests are coming in to Adj. Trickey of the Salvation Army asking for help from women of the city to give one or two hours a day either assisting the nurses or doing a little work in the homes where the whole family is ill. If any person who can give a little time either gratuitously or for pay, will phone at once to the Adjutant at 603 it will be greatly appreciated. Everyone should unite in an effort to fight the ‘Flu’ to a finish.”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Everett Brown Killed. Mr. and Mrs. Egbert G. Brown, residing at 36 Sinclair street, city, this morning received the sad message from the Director of Records that their son, Private Everett Brown was killed in action on September 28th. Private Brown, who was 23 years of age, enlisted and went overseas with a battalion from this city. He had been in the trenches about 2 months, when he met his death. The bereaved parents will receive the heartfelt sympathy of all citizens.”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Called by Death. The influenza epidemic has been responsible for a number of deaths in this city and vicinity during the past few days and to-day the list was added to.

‘Mrs. Warner Losee. Mrs. Warner Losee passed away yesterday at the home of her brother-in-law, Mr. Joseph Losee, 112 Pinnacle street, city. Deceased was 31 years of age and was a member of St. Michael’s Church. Pneumonia was the cause of death. Besides her husband four small children survive.’

‘Keitha Keller. Miss Keitha Keller, a daughter of Mr. Ryan Keller, residing at Canifton, passed away this morning. Deceased was about 23 years of age and had been ill for some days. She was a young lady who was well known and had many friends who will regret to learn of her demise.’

‘Pte. Bolton. Pte. Harry Bolton, a member of the First Depot Battalion, stationed at this city, died this morning. Deceased was 22 years of age, and his home was at Peterboro, where the body was this afternoon taken for interment after being prepared for burial at Tickell & Sons undertaking establishment.’

[Note: Private Harry Bolton died on October 17, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 370 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

‘Florence Wickett. At Niagara Falls, N.Y., last evening Miss Florence Wickett, aged 26 years, daughter of Mr. George Wickett, of Foxboro. Deceased was a nurse-in-training at a hospital at Niagara Falls and was a victim of the Flu. She was a popular young lady and highly esteemed by all who knew her. The body will be brought to Foxboro for interment.’

‘Sergt.-Major Dickinson. Sergt.-Major J. C. Dickinson, who was attached to the First Depot Battalion in this city, died here last evening. The body was taken to Tickell & Sons undertaking establishment where it was prepared for burial and shipped to St. Mary’s, Ont. Deceased was 20 years of age, and was born at Perth, being a son of Mr. John Dickinson of that place.’

[Note: Company Sergeant Major Clesson John Dickinson died on October 16, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 397 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

‘Newbold D. Carter. After an illness of a few days from an attack of pneumonia, Mr. Newbold D. Carter of Deseronto, died yesterday. Deceased was a popular shoe merchant and was a son of Mr. T. N. Carter of Trenton, Ont., and a nephew of W. W. Carter, lumber merchant of Toronto. He is survived by his wife and four young children. Mr. Carter had been identified with the shoe business in Deseronto for the last twenty years.’

‘Mrs. Robt. Newberry. Mrs. Robt. Newberry, who died in St. Louis, and whose remains were interred in the Belleville cemetery upon the 15th inst., was Miss Esther Benjamin, eldest daughter of the late George Benjamin, and in whose office the late Sir Mackenzie Bowell became an apprentice, and subsequently publisher of The Intelligencer. Miss Benjamin married the late Robert Newberry, teacher of the High School here and who was most popular and highly esteemed. Mrs. Newberry always exhibited great love for her native city. She has left three sons and three daughters. Her sisters, Mrs. E. F. Milburn, Mrs. MacDonald and Mrs. Shaw still survive.’

‘Arthur E. Wrightmeyer. At an early hour this morning Mr. Arthur Eugene Wrightmeyer one of Belleville’s well-known citizens passed away at his late home on Octavia Street as the result of an attack of pneumonia. Deceased was born at Selby, Ont., and was 40 years of age and was a son of the late Mr. G. F. Wrightmeyer, and had resided in this city the greater portion of his life. By occupation he was a barber and conducted a successful business on Front Street. He was a member of The Belleville Lodge A.F. & A.M.  No. 123 and was also a member of the Orange Order.

Surviving are a widow and one daughter Miss Valiere, also one brother and three sisters. The brother, Mr. W. H. Wrightmeyer, conducts a grocery business in this city and the sisters are Mrs. Walter Luscombe and Mrs. F. Buckley of Belleville and Mrs. Arthur Watson of Toronto. Arthur as he was familiarly called was deservedly popular and his demise is sincerely regretted by a host of friends. To the bereaved will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of all friends.’ ”

The Intelligencer October 17, 1918 (page 8)

“Board of Health Public Notice. To comply with the order issued by the Medical Health Officer who has closed all places where large gatherings of people congregate, we have decided for the welfare of the public at large, to cancel our clerks’ profit-sharing sale which naturally would attract large crowds. F. W. Woolworth Co., Ltd.”

 

 

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