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100 Years Ago: Private John Edgar Canniff Killed in Action, Coal Arrives in Belleville, Private Patrick Leo Doyle Missing, Belleville Fair, Women’s Home League Sale

The Intelligencer August 28, 1918 (page 1)

“Pte. John E. Canniff Killed in Action. Another Belleville boy has made the supreme sacrifice for King and Country. Yesterday afternoon Mr. Lyle Canniff, residing at 121 Yeomans St. received the following telegram, which refers to his brother: Ottawa, August 27th, 1918. L. V. Canniff, 121 Yeomans Street, Belleville. Deeply regret to inform you that 1,093,324 Pte. John Edgar Canniff, officially reported killed in action on August 10th, 1918. Director of Records.

Pte. Canniff enlisted and went overseas with the 155th Battalion in this city. For some time previous to enlistment he was engaged in railway work. He was about 28 years of age and was a son of the late Mr. John Canniff, preceded him to the tomb, was unmarried. Jack, as he was familiarly called had many friends here who will regret to learn of his death. His mother, Mrs. Emma Jane Canniff, preceded him to the tomb some weeks ago. One brother, Lyle, survives, also three sisters, Mrs. Isaac Frost, of Edmonton, Mrs. H. Leavens, of Toronto, and Mrs. James Shortts of this city. To the bereaved will be extended the heartfelt sympathy of all citizens.”

[Note: Private John Edgar Canniff died on August 10, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 380 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer August 28, 1918 (page 5)

“Coal for the City. A car of nut coal arrived here today having been consigned to the Fuel Committee of the city Council. It was a good sample of coal. The members of the committee were unable to state what the fuel would be sold for as the bill of lading had not arrived.”

The Intelligencer August 28, 1918 (page 5)

“Another Son Wounded. Mrs. Elizabeth Doyle, residing at 156 Front street, was yesterday in receipt of the following telegram: Ottawa, Aug. 26. Sincerely regret to inform you 636827 Pte. Patrick Leo Doyle, infantry, officially reported missing, believed wounded, August 9th. Director of Records.

Pte. Doyle left Belleville with the 155th Battalion, and has two brothers in active service overseas, and both of them have been wounded. The many friends of Leo in this city will sincerely hope for the better in his case.”

The Intelligencer August 28, 1918 (page 5)

“Belleville’s Fair. On Monday next Labor Day Belleville fair will open and continue the following day. The management are making every effort to have the fair a success and indications are that their efforts will not be in vain. From Mr. R. H. Ketcheson, the Secretary, we learn that the entries in the various departments are good, and in some cases in excess of former years.

An entertaining feature will be the display exhibited by the Returned Soldiers War Display Company of Beaverton. This display consists of souvenirs collected on several important battlefields of the present campaign.

A good programme of events has been arranged for. At 1.30 on Monday the fair will be formally declared opened by Mayor Platt, who will deliver an address. Two speeding events will be on the afternoon programme, namely the 2.30 and 2.18 class for which there are a number of entries. There will be other special attractions. The 15th regimental band will furnish a programme of music each afternoon.”

The Intelligencer August 28, 1918 (page 5)

“Sale of Work. Mrs. Major R. D. Ponton will open the sale of work at the S. A. Citadel this afternoon at 3 o’clock. The Women’s Home League have been working very hard for this sale, which is in the interests of the soldiers overseas. A number of curios will be exhibited.”

 

By | August 28th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Poster for Sailors’ Week, Private Albert Edward Baldwin Suffers Gas Poisoning, Private James Ernest Richardson Dunlop Wounded

The Intelligencer August 27, 1918 (page 3)

Poster for Sailors' Week

“15,000 Merchant Marine Men Make the Supreme Sacrifice. Many of our seamen have been on torpedoed ships, not once only, but several times. Death lurks in the way of every ship. The submarine and loathsome mine have claimed over 15,000 men of our Merchant Marine. They died for us!

What of their dependents—the widows and orphans? Governments make no provision for them because the Merchant Marine is not a recognized arm of the service, like the Army and Navy. That is why we hold Sailors’ Week September 1st to 7th Inclusive.”

The Intelligencer August 27, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. A. E. Baldwin Wounded. Mrs. A. E. Baldwin, 22 Green St., this city, has received word that her husband, Pte. A. E. Baldwin, has been admitted to hospital suffering from gas poisoning. Mr. Baldwin’s many friends will remember that prior to enlistment he was engaged as caretaker of the local Y.M.C.A. He went overseas over a year ago with the 254th Battalion.

The following is the telegram sent: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 1093398 Pte. Albert Edward Baldwin, infantry, officially reported admitted to Third West General Hospital, Cardiff, August 20th, gassed.—Director of Records.”

The Intelligencer August 27, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. E. R. Dunlop Wounded. Two sons of Mrs. Elizabeth Dunlop, 156 Willow Avenue, Toronto, have gone overseas. Jas. S. Dunlop was killed in action June, 1917. Now Pte. J. E. R. Dunlop is reported shot in the thigh August 13. He went overseas in October, 1916, was for a time Sgt.-Instructor in England, and has been in France since March.

He was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, 24 years ago; came to Canada in 1910, and at the time of his enlistment was managing a branch store for the Wm. Davies Company at Belleville. His mother has had three nephews, all the sons of the same parents, killed in action.”

By | August 27th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Merchant Sailors’ Dependents Appeal to Canada, Ad for Wrigley’s, Private Albert Edward Flinn Wounded, Memorial Service for Sergt. Charles Lewis White, Memorial Service for Members of Orange Order to Be Held, Ad for Ritchie’s

The Intelligencer August 26, 1918 (page 2)

“Heroic Families Are In Want. When the history of the war comes to be written some of the brightest pages will be found recording the deeds of the Merchant Seamen. Day by day and week by week, in spite of the submarine, the floating mine, and the most destructive devices known to maritime warfare, the merchant men ply the ocean and carry munition supplies and food ‘over there.’

Regardless of every peril 300,000 merchant seamen still ‘carry on’; fifteen thousand of them have already paid the price of their bravery. As members of an unofficial service, governments make provisions for them. Right or wrong, it is a fact that their dependents have no one to look to but a grateful nation.

‘Sailors’ Week’ is a Dominion-wide campaign to raise funds to relieve the distress of these widows and orphans of the sea. Ontario is asked to raise $1,000,000. Give generously, for these men gave their lives for you.”

The Intelligencer August 26, 1918 (page 5)

Advert for Wrigley's gum

“Wrigley’s. Keep Wrigley’s in mind as the longest-lasting confection you can buy. Send it to the boys at the front.

War Time Economy in Sweetmeats—a 5-cent package of Wrigley’s will give you several days’ enjoyment: it’s an investment in benefit as well as pleasure, for it helps teeth, breath, appetite, digestion.

Chew it after every meal. The Flavour Lasts. Sealed tight—Kept right. Made in Canada.”

The Intelligencer August 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. A. E. Flinn Wounded. Pte. A. E. Flinn wounded, enlisted in January, 1915 and went overseas in April of the same year. He is a native of England, and came to Canada six years ago. He has seen much active fighting, having been wounded in the present war in November 1917. Pte. Flinn was formerly a farmer at Belleville. His sister, Miss Mabel Flinn, resides at 639 Euclid Avenue, Toronto.”

The Intelligencer August 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Memorial Service. A very impressive memorial service was held in St. Thomas’ church last evening for  the late Sergt. Chas. Lewis White, killed in action. After the processional hymn ‘How bright these glorious Spirits shine,’ the burial office was solemnly and earnestly recited by the rector, choir and people. The Nunc Dimittis was sung and the Archdeacon delivered a short address. …  ‘Nearer My God to Thee’ and ‘Abide With Me,’ were sung, as favorite hymns of the late soldier, and were rendered with much feeling by the choir and congregation. …

Sergt. White was born in England 29 years ago, and has been a resident of Belleville for years. He was a member of St. Thomas church and a good citizen, respected by all. The widow and two little children are left. Sergt. White spent two years on active service in France, was wounded at the battle of Passchendaele by a bursting shell, but continued to ‘carry on,’ and won the Military Medal for exceptional acts of bravery while himself suffering from wounds.”

[Note: Sergeant Charles Lewis White died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 521 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer August 26, 1918 (page 7)

“Memorial Service. The Rev. Brothers Swayne and Geen have been requested to conduct a memorial service in Christ Church on Sunday evening next, 1st September at 7 o’clock, for members of the Orange Order who have given their lives for King and country, in the world war.”

The Intelligencer August 26, 1918 (page 8)

Ad for Ritchie's store

“Ritchie’s. CARRY ON. The spirit that animates the boys in the trenches today is the spirit of ‘Carry On!’ They realize that what was worth doing when they started is still worth doing, and despite their troubles and hardships they intend to see it through.

We at home are urged to practice thrift and economy, and that is good sound advice, but there are other ways to practice thrift and economy besides curtailing expenditure. You can plan to purchase your necessary wearing apparel or commodities for the home in a store that puts quality first and yet always arranges to have its prices as low, if not lower than you will find elsewhere.

The Ritchie Store does that very thing—This Autumn season we are ‘carrying on’ with a more vigorous and progressive store policy than ever before.”

By | August 26th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Lt.-Col. Milton K. Adams Returns Home, Milton Edward Weese Killed in Action, David Ketcheson Has Operation, Thomas Walter Morris Wounded, David James McGlashon Wounded and Missing

The Intelligencer August 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Lt.-Col. Adams Home. After two years’ absence overseas, Lt.-Col. Milton K. Adams reached Picton on Tuesday afternoon of this week looking well after his extended work in military service in England and France. Col. Adams is certainly entitled to a well earned rest. He is one of those who has done his bit from the first and his record is one of which the old county is proud.

At the beginning of the war the Colonel was in charge of the 16th Prince Edward Regiment and at once threw himself into the work of military organization. After a few months he was given a commission as Commanding Officer of the 155th Battalion which was recruited from Hastings and Prince Edward. This battalion went into camp at Kingston in the spring of 1916, going overseas in October. The battalion was broken up and sent to France in drafts, and for some time Col. Adams was in charge of reserve depots in England, going to France in the summer of 1917 where he was area commandant until returning to Canada.”

The Intelligencer August 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. M. E. Weese Killed. ‘I can hardly realize it. I had such a lovely letter from him and when I was reading it, he was dead,’ said Mrs. M. E. Weese, 124 Atlas avenue, Toronto, speaking of the death of her husband who was killed in action on August 6th.

Pte. Weese enlisted in the 155th Battalion in December 1915, and went overseas in October, 1916. He was a cook and was stationed at Witley Camp. Pte. Weese had a son at the front, who returned wounded in April, 1917. Private Weese was 36 years old. Before enlisting he was a talcum miner at Madoc, Ont.”

The Intelligencer August 24, 1918 (page 7)

David Ketcheson“Operated Upon. Lieut. David V. Ketcheson, M. C., son of ex-Mayor Ketcheson, was operated on at Kingston hospital and is making favorable progress. Lieut. Ketcheson was severely wounded while on active service and the operation was necessary as the result of his wounds.”

The Intelligencer August 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Morris Wounded. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morris, 94 Station street, city, have been officially notified that their son, Walter Morris, infantry, was admitted to Fifth General Hospital at Rouen, France, on August 11th, with gunshot wound in left leg.”

The Intelligencer August 24, 1918 (page 7)

“Wounded and Missing. Sergt. J. M. McGlashan at the Belleville Armories has been notified that Pte. David James McGlashan, infantry, is officially reported wounded and missing August 11. Pte. McGlashan went overseas with the 155th Battalion, and was transferred to another battalion for active service in France. His many friends trust that better news will soon be received from this gallant soldier.”

By | August 24th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Canadian Casualties, Playgrounds Festival for Children, Poster for Sailors’ Week, Leave Granted for Jewish New Year, Sidney Garden Party Held, Morley Louis Ackerman Wounded, Vincent Whittie Killed

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 1)

“Casualties Among Canadian Troops. Killed in Action. Stirling—A. Gilroy, V. Whitty; Belleville—C. L. White; Harold—E. G. Runnalls; Frankford—O. N. Pearson.

Wounded. Maynooth—F. Bair; Belleville—H. Anderson; Trenton—R. H. Sandford.

Died of Wounds. Belleville—E. R. Hodges.”

[Note: Private George Arthur Gilroy died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 415 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Sergeant Charles Lewis White died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 521 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private Ernest Garfield Runnalls died on August 16, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 495 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private Oscar Nelson Pearson died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 483 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

[Note: Private Ernest Richard Hodges died on August 11, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 430 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 1)

“Belleville Children Make Merry At Play Grounds Festival. Laughter and song in merry peals coming from the East Belleville supervised Playgrounds yesterday, betokened that something special was in progress. The annual festival was being held and the children who enjoy and benefit by the games and instructions at the supervised playgrounds of East and West Belleville were showing how nicely they could sing the choruses, Folk songs and pretty dances as well as make fancy work and excel in athletics.

The festival was in charge of Miss Simpkins, Supervisor of the East Belleville playgrounds, and Miss Nichols, of the West Belleville playgrounds, while Mr. H. P. Ellis, of the Y.M.C.A. looked after the sports.”

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 6)

Poster for Sailors' Week

“Our Prosperity And What It Has Cost. You remember the uncertainty as regards trade when the war broke out. We finished 1913 with a balance of $293,000,000 against us.

The British Navy swept the German flag off the seas. The submarine remained, and the floating mine. Death lurked in the path of every vessel that carried the products of our farms and factories. None but heroes of the finest type would have faced such dangers. But because the men of the Merchant Marine did face them, we finished 1917 with a trade balance of $314,000,000 in our favor. But what a price has been paid!

Remember by Giving. Sailors’ Week, September 1st to 7th, inclusive. The Navy League of Canada.”

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 7)

“Leave to Jewish Soldiers. Ottawa has instructed the local military authorities to grant leave to all Jewish soldiers from sunset September 6 till sunset September 8 in connection with the Jewish New Year celebration.”

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 7)

“Garden Party. The spacious grounds adjoining the residence of Mr. Bailey on the Second Concession of Sidney, were the scene of an enjoyable event last evening when the Ladies Red Cross Association, Mrs. Lawrence, President, held a garden party. There was a large attendance, an excellent program, and everyone present had a lovely time.

Mr. H. F. Ketcheson, ex-Mayor of Belleville, was a very capable chairman and kept everyone in good humor. Readings and recitations were contributed in charming manner by Miss Bishop, Miss Farrell and Miss Adams of Belleville, and addresses were given by the chairman, Mr. Ketcheson and N. Parliament, M.P.P.”

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Ackerman Wounded. Mrs. Robert Roe, 30 Chatham street, has been officially notified that Pte. Morley Louis Ackerman, infantry, was admitted to No. 6 General Hospital, Rouen, August 4th, with gunshot wound to his side. Pte. Ackerman was a nephew of Mrs. Roe and enlisted with the 39th Battalion.”

The Intelligencer August 23, 1918 (page 7)

“Vincent Whittie Killed. Many friends will mourn the death of Pte. Vincent Whittie of Stirling, who has been reported killed in battle. He was a native of this place and played hockey in the Trent Valley League, and later with Belleville, in the O.H.A. for several seasons. He was a son of Mr. George Whittie, of Stirling, and was a splendid type of young Canadian manhood, an athlete of considerable prominence, and a star hockey player. Vincent Whittie was one of those who ‘played up and played the game’ square and fair.”

[Note: Private Vincent Whitty died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 522 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

 

By | August 23rd, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Women Must Stop Wearing Badges of Discharged Soldiers as Brooches, John McGuire Wounded, Farmers’ Picnic at Sandbanks, Cadets and Mechanics Wanted for Royal Air Force, Earl Franklin McCabe Killed in Action

The Intelligencer August 22, 1918 (page 1)

“Prevent Women Wearing Badges. Toronto. Women who are in the habit of wearing badges given to soldiers discharged from service in the army will require to be careful in the future regarding the use of these buttons, as the military officials of the Department of Militia and Defence state that the badges are being used extensively as brooches, and orders were received at military headquarters in Toronto yesterday authorizing steps to be taken to put a stop to the practice. From now on any person other than the person entitled, who is found wearing any of the service buttons will be liable to prosecution.

The authorities point out that the badges are given to the soldiers to represent the nature of their service with the Canadian forces, and that it is entirely illegal for anyone who has not seen service to wear them. It has been found that the badges in most favor with the women are those presented to men who have been discharged in England, because of their ornamental design and because they are more fitted for use as brooches. In the case of the smaller buttons it has been found that they have been made ornamental by having them mounted in gold and silver.

It was never the intention that the badges should be transferred to relatives or friends of the soldiers, said a military official last evening, and he hoped that when the matter was drawn to the attention of those violating the regulation the practice of wearing them would be discontinued. He desired to state, however, that the censure of the department at Ottawa did not in any way apply to the relatives of soldiers who had received posthumous decorations, as in such cases those persons were legally entitled to wear them.”

The Intelligencer August 22, 1918 (page 5)

“Pte. McGuire Wounded. Pte. John McGuire was wounded on August 14, and is now in the Fifth General Hospital at Rouen, France, according to official notice received to-day by Mrs. Mildred McGuire, 70 Gordon Street.”

The Intelligencer August 22, 1918 (page 5)

“Farmers’ Picnic. A number of Belleville citizens are attending the annual Farmers’ Picnic at the Sand Banks to-day. Several speakers are expected from Toronto and a splendid program has been arranged. Mr. P. F. Brockel, Y. M. C. A. Secretary, and Officer Commanding Soldiers of the Soil in this district, is in charge of the sports, in which a large number of the boys and girls engaged in farm work are taking part. The Ontario baseball team left at noon to play with the Picton team at the picnic.”

The Intelligencer August 22, 1918 (page 5)

“Cadets and Mechanics Wanted. The Royal Air Force has recruited 1,000 mechanics since recruiting was opened on May 20 of this year. A further 1,000 are to be recruited in the next two months, and excellent opportunities are presented for Category ‘B’ men at the present time in all branches. There is an urgent call for cooks, medical orderlies, shoemakers and clerks, and a few barbers are also required, in addition to men of mechanical trades. …  Cadet recruiting is proceeding apace and an excellent class of men are still coming forward.

One thousand women are now employed in the air force in Canada, and this number will increase also. All indications point to the air force in Canada being numerically much stronger at the end of this year than at any previous time. It is not generally known that the air force has over one thousand civilian Canadians engaged in recruiting throughout the Dominion.”

The Intelligencer August 22, 1918 (page 6)

“Earl F. McCabe Killed in Action. The sad news reached Belleville yesterday of the death of Earl Franklin McCabe, who was killed in action in France, on August 8th, while engaged in the great Canadian drive, which was so successful in advancing the cause of the allies.

Gunner McCabe was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McCabe, Bleecker Avenue, and only nineteen years of age. In March, 1917, while a student at the Ontario Business College he enlisted in the Cobourg Heavy Battery, and went overseas. He was a member of the Baptist Church and Sabbath School and a splendid young Canadian of many admirable qualities promising a successful career in life. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved family.”

[Note: Gunner Earl Franklin McCabe died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 453 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

By | August 22nd, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Armouries to Be Demobilization Centre, Benjamin Charles Bunton Wounded, Poster for Sailors’ Week, German Morgan Wounded, Harry Knot Wounded, Richard Stapley Wounded, Joseph Banville Killed in Action

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 1)

“Belleville Depot for Returned Canadian Soldiers Pending Discharge. City Armouries Have Been Fitted up to Accommodate Large Number of Soldiers Who Will Make Headquarters Here And Medical Boards Will Be Established.

Belleville will be a military demobilization centre with headquarters where returned soldiers will have living accommodation and receive Medical Boards. The Armouries have been fitted up for this purpose and over three hundred soldiers can be cared for there.

It is the intention to send to Belleville returned soldiers who are not hospital cases, walking wounded, who will be cared for here and ultimately receive their discharge here. Medical Boards will be stationed here and the necessary staff. Hospital cases will be kept in Kingston for treatment.

The old cannery has at last been abandoned by the authorities and dismantled.

Considerable new plumbing and steam heating has been installed in the Armouries to furnish comfort and convenience for the invalided soldiers. Smith & Co. have the plumbing and heating contract, which is quite extensive and includes shower baths, large lavatories, wash rooms, kitchen, etc.

The practice of sending all the wounded soldiers to Kingston and Toronto has been very unsatisfactory and it is planned to make discharge depots in various centres, including Belleville, which will be able to accommodate up to five hundred soldiers at one time.”

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 3)

Benjamin Bunton“Thrice Wounded Gassed Twice. Gunner Benjamin Bunton of Belleville Again a Casualty.

Ottawa, August 20, 1918. Mr. B. C. Bunton, 41 Pine Street, Belleville, Ont. Sincerely regret to inform you that 113117 Gunner Benjamin Charles Bunton officially reported admitted to Australian General Hospital, Abbeville on August 9. Gunshot wound in left leg. Director of Records.

Such was the telegram Mr. Bunton received yesterday from Ottawa informing him of the wounding of his son Ben, who joined the 8th C.M.R. in August 1915 and left for England on September of the same year, going to France early in the next year. This is the third time he has been wounded and also gassed twice.

A similar telegram was received by Mr. Bunton on Sunday informing him that William Thomas had been wounded. The brothers were both wounded on the same day. Ben was a gunner in the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Company and had served with that unit ever since he went to France. Before joining the soldiers, he was employed in The Intelligencer Office.”

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 3)

Poster for Sailors' Week

“Remember by Giving. 300,000 Men Brave the U-Boats for Us. No Government Allowance for their Dependents!

Give! Give liberally! $1,000,000 is Ontario’s objective! Ontario has never failed!

Sailors’ Week, September 1st to 7th inclusive. The Navy League of Canada.”

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Morgan Wounded. Mrs. Mary Morgan, 13 Geddes St., city, received this official telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you, Pte. German Morgan, mounted services, is officially reported admitted to No. 15 General Hospital, Rouen, August 12, gunshot wounds both extremities.’

Pte. Morgan was a Hastings County boy and enlisted with the 210th Battalion at Moose Jaw. While in Belleville he was employed as brakeman on the G.T.R.”

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Knott Wounded. Pte. Harry Knot, whose name was mentioned in Monday night’s casualty list, went overseas in May, 1917, with the 254th Battalion from this city, and went to France the following October. Previous to enlisting Pte. Knott was employed at the Steel Plant of Canada. His many friends will hope that his wounds do not prove serious.”

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Stapley Wounded. Richard Stapley, Canifton Road, has received the following official telegram from the Director of Record at Ottawa: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you 2584305 Pte. Edward Givens Stapley, infantry, officially reported admitted to 49 Clearing Casualty Station, Aug. 11. Gun shot wound, abdomen.’ Pte. Stapley left with the 1st Eastern Depot Battalion, November 1917, and went to France in April, 1918.”

The Intelligencer August 21, 1918 (page 8)

“Killed in Action. Official notice was received this morning that James Banville, a Belleville soldier, had been killed in action on August 11th. He was an adopted son of Capt. Fagan, and had many friends who deeply regret his death.”

[Note: Gunner Joseph Banville died on August 11, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 363 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

By | August 21st, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Edward Bellow Wounded, Sergt. Charles White Killed in Action, Corporal Fred Belton and Sergt. Alfred Belton Wounded, Percy Grant Palmer Wounded

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Pte. Bellow Wounded. Miss Edith Asselstine, 78 Mill street, has received the following telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that Pte. Edward Bellow, infantry, is officially reported admitted to 12 General Hospital, Rouen on August 12th, gunshot wound in finger.’ This is the second time Pte. Bellow has been wounded.”

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Sergt. White Killed. Mrs. Ellen White, 78 Gordon street, has received a telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa, conveying the sad intelligence that Sergt. Chas. White, infantry, was killed in action, August 8. Sergt. White had recently been awarded the Military Medal for acts of gallantry and devotion to duty.

He served two years in France before making the supreme sacrifice and was a patriot and a hero in every sense of the word. Previous to enlistment he was engaged at the Anglo-American Hotel here as chef. He was 29 years of age, born in England, and leaves a wife and child who reside at 78 Gordon street.

A sister, Miss White, of Toronto, is with the bereaved family just now. A memorial service will be held for Sergt. Charles Lewis White, M. M., Sunday evening at St. Thomas Church.”

[Note: Sergeant Charles Lewis White died on August 8, 1918. He is commemorated on Page 521 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.]

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Father and Son Fell Fighting For King, Canada and Freedom. Miss Florence Belton, 219 Front street, received a telegram from the Director of Records, Ottawa, apprising her that Corporal Frederick Belton was admitted to the First Birmingham War Hospital at Birmingham, England, on August 11, suffering with a gunshot wound in his arm.

Corporal Fred Belton, went overseas with the 39th Battalion, in 1915. He was twice wounded at the Battle of the Somme, Sept. 20th, 1916. He returned to the front in February, 1917. Was at Vimy Ridge, wounded again on the Somme, gunshot in the arm, 9th of August, 1918.

He is a son of Sergt. Alfred Belton, one of the ‘Originals’, who was Provost-Sergt. of Belleville in the 34th Battery, and went overseas with the First Contingent, going to France February 7th, 1915. He was in France two years, wounded at Fleur Baiux, but was able to remain with the guns. He went through the Battle of Langemarck, April 22, 1915; June, Festubert; July, Givincy; Aug. La Bassee and Armentieres; again going into action at Ploegstreete; returned to Ypres salient, February 1917; Dickibush and Hill 60 till July 1917, and then went to the Battle of the Somme, where he met his son Fred, not knowing that he was in France.

A week after this meeting father and son were both wounded and on their way to Blighty. Sergt. Belton, the father, was invalided home after being ten months in the Hospital, November, 1917; discharged January 31, 1918.

A gallant father of a gallant son in Sergt. Alfred Belton, late 1st Battery, 1st Brigade, C. F. A., late of all the glorious battlefields of France where he ‘done his bit’ all the way, now residing at 145 Foster Avenue, Belleville.”

The Intelligencer August 20, 1918 (page 7)

“Driver Palmer Wounded. Mrs. Frances Palmer, 25 ½ Campbell street, received the following telegram from the Director of Records at Ottawa: ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that Driver Percy Grant Palmer, artillery, is officially reported admitted to No. 3 Australian Hospital, Abbeville, August 10th, with gunshot wounds in the side.’ ”

 

By | August 20th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Belleville Coal Scow Overturns, Harold Holway Wounded, Poster for Sailors’ Week, Poster for Belleville Fair, William Thomas Bunton Wounded, Letter of Thanks

The Intelligencer August 19, 1918 (page 1)

“Belleville Coal Scow Turns Turtle on Lake Ontario. Special Despatch to the Intelligencer, Canadian Press, Limited. Kingston. A scow loaded with 282 gross tons of coal for Downey & Co., of Belleville, sprang a leak off nine-mile point yesterday morning while in tow of the Argyle, of Montreal, and after getting inside of the point it suddenly turned turtle. Fortunately the tug held on with one line and towed the upturned scow to port.

Manager D. W. Patterson was aboard the scow up until an hour before the accident happened. The loss is estimated at $2500.”

The Intelligencer August 19, 1918 (page 1)

“Pte. Holway Wounded. Mr. Aubrey Holway, 165 Church street, was officially notified to-day of the wounding of his son, Harold, whose brother was recently invalided home as a result of wounds received on active service in France. The telegram reads as follows:

Ottawa, August 19, 1918. Aubrey Holway, 165 Church Street, Belleville. Sincerely regret to inform you 636263 Harold Holway, infantry, officially reported admitted to General Hospital, Rouen, August 9th, 1918. Gunshot wound in arm. Director of Records.”

The Intelligencer August 19, 1918 (page 6)

Poster for Sailors' Week

“Remember by Giving. At any other time than this, the heroism of the men of the Merchant Marine would fill the newspapers. As it is, you simply read of so many tons of shipping sunk by submarines.

Yet from the few words you read, you must picture scores of scenes like the illustration. 15,000 men of this service, not officially recognized by the governments, have suffered death in order that soldiers, munitions and food may cross the ocean. Remember their widows and orphans, dependent for life itself on your generosity.

Let Your Donation Be An Appreciation of This Sacrifice!

Sailors’ Week, September 1st to 7th Inclusive. Ontario’s Objective $1,000,000. Ontario Has Never Failed! The Navy League of Canada.”

The Intelligencer August 19, 1918 (page 6)

Poster for Belleville Fair

“Belleville Fair. Labor Day, Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 2nd and 3rd 1918.

Be Patriotic and Attend the Fair. See the Immense Display—By the Returned Soldiers’ War Display Co. of Beaverton—Trenches and Dugouts—The Wonderful German Pillboxes—A Magnificent Display of War Relics Captured and Picked Up on the Battlefields of Flanders.

This is a grand opportunity for you to see with your own eyes the Trenches and Dugouts our boys are living in from day to day.

God Save the King! Arthur Jones, President. R. H. Ketcheson, Secretary.”

The Intelligencer August 19, 1918 (page 6)

“Pte. Bunton Wounded. Mr. B. C. Bunton, Pine Street, has received the following message from the Director of Records, Ottawa. ‘Sincerely regret to inform you that 636622 Pte. William Thomas Bunton, infantry, officially reported admitted to the 10th General Hospital, Rouen, August 9th, 1918. Gunshot wound left arm.’

Pte. Bunton enlisted in February 1916 and went overseas with the signallers of the 155th Battalion in October of the same year, and went to France in February 1918, and in June of this year met his brother Ben, who has been in France over three years, who has also been wounded twice and gassed twice.”

The Intelligencer August 19, 1918 (page 6)

“Appreciated Socks. The following letter received by the Principal of Queen Victoria Public School is self-explanatory: The Canadian War Contingent Association, 123 Victoria Street, London, S. W., July 15, 1918.

The Principal, Queen Victoria School, Pine Street, Belleville, Ont. Dear Sir:—In a recent consignment sent through the St. Julien Chapter per Mrs. Evan MacColl, were two boxes containing each 50 pairs of socks forwarded by the children of your school under the superintendency of the teachers.

I am directed by the Executive to convey to your pupils our heartfelt thanks for this most welcome gift, and also to say how much we appreciate the interest which the children take in this work for the men at the front. With grateful thanks, Sincerely yours, Eleanor McLaren Brown, Hon. Sec. Ladies Committee, C. W. C. A.”

By | August 19th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments

100 Years Ago: Ad for O’Keefe’s Imperial Beers, Capt. Edwin Arnold Adams Wounded, Last Chance for Deserters, Halston Women’s Institute Garden Party, Mayor’s Warning About Coal

The Intelligencer August 17, 1918 (page 5)

Advert for O'Keefe's Imperial Beers

“Malt and Hops for Health and Vigor. O’Keefe’s Imperial Beers: Ale, Lager, Stout. O’Keefe’s Imperial brews are prepared to conform strictly to the legal requirements and enable every person to increase health and vigor by the daily use of a beverage that is delightful to the palate and convenient in every way for family use.

Canada Food Board L-102.”

The Intelligencer August 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Capt. E. A. Adams Wounded. Mrs. Adams, wife of Lt.-Col. Adams of Picton, has received word that their son, Capt. Edwin Arnold Adams of the infantry, was admitted to the British Red Cross Hospital at Rouen, France, on August 8th, suffering from severe gunshot wound in the ankle.

Capt. Adams has served with distinction in the war. He is the only child of Lt.-Col. and Mrs. Adams and enlisted with the 39th Battalion. Since going overseas he has been on active service almost continuously. Some time ago he was wounded but returned to active service again after a short time. Col. Adams has also been to France for some time past.”

The Intelligencer August 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Chance for Deserters. It is hoped that all outstanding absentees and deserters in Military District No. 3 will take advantage of the opportunity given them to escape punishment by reporting for duty not later than the 24th instant. This chance is afforded them by the Governor-General’s proclamation of August 1st.

Those who report for duty up to 24th August will be free from punishment, and such of them as are entitled to it will be given harvest or other leave. Absentees and deserters failing to report during the period of amnesty must understand that they have no clemency to hope for. Instructions have already been received at District Headquarters to try by court martial and inflict severe penalties upon all outstanding absentees and deserters apprehended after 24th August, 1918.”

The Intelligencer August 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Successful Red Cross Function. Under the auspices of the ladies of Halston Women’s Institute, there was held on Wednesday evening in the school grounds at Mount Pleasant Church, one of the most enjoyable and profitable garden parties of the season. The cash receipts were over $200.

The Sulphide Band furnished excellent music and the general programme was of a high character. Those participating were Misses Lawrenson, Hamilton, Pitman and Messrs. Gowe and Parks. A very instructive address was delivered by Col. E. D. O’Flynn. Mr. John Elliott acted as Chairman. The meeting was brought to a close by singing the National Anthem and cheers for the ladies of the local branch of the Canadian Red Cross Society.”

The Intelligencer August 17, 1918 (page 7)

“Mayor’s Warning. Mayor Platt states that he has been officially notified that the allotment of coal for the city of Belleville will fall far short of the usual amount this year, and he wishes to warn the citizens to lay in as large a supply of wood as they possibly can or there will be severe suffering in the city this winter.”

By | August 17th, 2018|Intelligencer WW1 Local News|0 Comments